Article 43

 

Workplace

Wednesday, October 07, 2020

Take This Job And Shove It

image: wind up workers

[L]ivery car driver Douglas Schifter killed himself outside the gates of City Hall, after writing in a suicide note posted to Facebook, “I will not be a slave working for chump change. I would rather be dead.”
- Democracy Now, March 22, 2018

(American economics is so badly wrong that it says absurd, bizarre, hilarious things like: the economy’s booming!! at the precise moment that life expectancy is cratering, suicide and depression are skyrocketing, young people can’t afford to start families, old people can’t afford to retire, and average incomes have barely budged for half a century. LOL So when people living shorter, unhappier, grimmer, poorer lives, to the point that they kill themselves in despair, have become a “booming economy,” then, my friends, a theory of dunces has replaced reality with a grotesque and backwards illusion. The earth isn’t flat - though American economics would like us all to believe it is, in a weirdly Soviet twist.)
- Looking to 2019

I am single, 64, getting Social Security and working whatever jobs I can find that pay the bills. I’m finally in a job I like now, but it has taken years to get to this place. During those years, I worked in factories, in retail and at a gas station, and I did home care. You name it, and I’ve done it. I’m tired of job hopping to survive.
- Anita

Most of the women (and men) I worked with who suffered a similar fate never seemed to quite get back to where they were even though they worked as hard as I did and even in the booming tech market. And I pretty much expect every day that this could happen to me again, no matter how hard I work or how many points I put on the board. The worst part is the isolation. This is the first time I have ever let on how bad it was (is), and it still feels extremely risky to do so in a valley rife with swagger.
-J

This happened to me in my 40s, and it took me a good 10 years to get back to a normal wage. It took periods of working three jobs at crummy wages and doing whatever I had to do to keep going. The truth is, your friends don’t notice the struggle, because they fear it will happen to them. Decide who your genuine friends are, and come clean to them. If nothing else, it will help to talk about it and frees you up from pretending. This is more widespread than most people think.
- Linda

And exhorting us to simply save more without telling us how to do it doesn’t help us either. I went with my sister to one of those financial-planning seminars and had to leave the room a few times because I was so upset by what I was hearing. It was just so sobering. I have no savings. The planner kept talking about putting 30 percent of your assets into this or that thing. Well, 30 percent of zero is zero. 
- Chris
- Boomers Burned By Recession Part 8

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I can understand where all these people are coming from.  LOOKING BACK at my own fall from happy middle-class American, to long-term unemployed/underemployed poor - the way I look at cheap low-wage temp jobs changed dramatically.

Before LOOSING HOPE OF LIVING OUT OLD AGE with a little peace and dignity, I’d DO ANYTHING TO MAKE A FEW BUCKS, which meant taking short-term minimum wage temp jobs, even if for one night sweeping floors for the janitor that called in sick that day - and come home with a check for $20.

TODAY I feel like an enabler of a SYSTEM that EXPLOITS WORKERS, and REWARDS CORPORATE GREED.

Slavery in the U.S. may be illegal - but these crappy temp jobs that pay near nothing seem pretty close.

I guess that’s the PROCESS of middle-class turned POOR.  Kind of like the STAGES OF GRIEF. It starts with a sort of denial that translates to HOPE, moves through resentment (anger) of DEAD-END, low-pay jobs that wears you out while spiraling down a financial hole, and ends in ACCEPTANCE meaning SUICIDE, or living in POVERTY.

I’m guessing some BOOMERS that got the same BAD LUCK as me - FEEL THE SAME.

Elvis/Ed

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The Silent Exodus Nobody Sees: Leaving Work Forever
The “take this job and shove it” exodus is silently gathering momentum.

By Charles Hugh Smith
Of Two Minds
September 23, 2020

The exodus out of cities is getting a lot of attention, but the exodus that will unravel our economic and social orders is getting zero attention: the exodus from work. Like the exodus from troubled urban cores, the exodus from work has long-term, complex causes that the pandemic has accelerated.

These are the core drivers of the exodus from work.

1. Labor’s share of the economy has been in multi-decade decline. It’s easy to blame globalization and/or automation--and it’s true that the decline in labor’s share accelerated from 2000 on. But this trend began around 1970, long before China joined the World Trade Organization and the advent of “software eating the world.”

image: fred wage decline over the last 50 years

2. While it’s convenient for those reaping the big gains to blame globalization and/or automation, the real driver was financialization - the neoliberal move to deregulate finance so it could turn everything into an exploitable “market” that could be made to serve one master: shareholder value, the innocuous-sounding code-phrase for anything goes and winner takes most--if you’re rich.

image: fred inequality by income last 40 years

Shareholder value was the super-wealthy’s self-serving justification for unlimited greed as corporations went from being enterprises serving communities, the national interest, employees, customers and shareholders to financialization machines whose sole purpose was enriching insiders via loading the company with debt to pay huge bonuses to top managers, stock buybacks funded by debt, the abandonment of trustworthy accounting principles and so on.

Financialization and the deification of shareholder value sluiced all the gains into the hands of the few at the top at the expense of the many. As the chart below indicates, the top 0.1% enjoyed income gains of around 350% since 1979 while the bottom 90% barely topped 20%--a number that would be sharply negative if real-world inflation were included.

Simply put, the bottom 90%--wage-earners--lost ground over the past four decades of financialization while the wealthy winners of financialization became super-wealthy. The rewards of labor/work have diminished to an extraordinary degree for the bottom 90%, and even the 91% - 99% bracket has found their labor has mostly served to enrich those above them.

These trends will drive both the top wage-earners and the bottom wage earners out of the workforce. The managerial class that keeps the whole machine glued together can either retire or use their human and financial capital to find other less stressful ways to make a living and downsize their expenses to match their reduced income.

Some will be voluntary, many will be involuntary, but the results will be the same: a mass exodus of hard-to-replace skilled workers. This is what I’m calling the take this job and shove it exodus.

Once the Federal Reserve starts sending “free money” directly to households, many at the bottom of the pay scale will realize they too can take this job and shove it.

In Unprecedented Monetary Overhaul, The Fed Is Preparing To Deposit “Digital Dollars” Directly To “Each American” (Zero Hedge)

‘I cry before work’: US essential workers burned out amid pandemic Essential workers reported stress caused by increased workloads, understaffing, fears over Covid and struggles in enforcing social distancing. (The Guardian)

What few well-paid apologists seem to realize is that to equal the purchasing power of the minimum wage I earned in 1970 ($1.65/hour), the minimum wage would have to be close to $20/hour now. The absurdly under-reported rate of official inflation (the Consumer Price Index) claims that a minimum wage of $12/hour now equals the purchasing power of $1.65/hour in 1970, but since I’ve kept records of all expenses I can report that this is totally false.

Wages’ share of the economy has been in a relentless 50-year slide. The entire machinery of inflation calculation has been driven by the desperate need to mask the true collapse of the purchasing power of wages.

Once the workforce awakens to this, the silent exodus out of the workforce will gather into a flood tide. Permanent unemployment payments, Universal Basic Income (UBI), free Fed money--regardless of the program or name, these will enable a mass exodus of those at the bottom of the workforce pay scale while burnout will also decimate the ranks of essential managerial / skilled workers.

It’s payback time, people. Hey, Financial Aristocracy, clean your own floors and slaughter your own meat. Hey, corrupt politicos and apparatchiks, wipe your own tables and watch your own brats. The take this job and shove it exodus is silently gathering momentum.

The Protected Class of pundits, technocrats, flunkies, toadies and enforcers believes the take this job and shove it exodus is “impossible”, just as everyone believed the Titanic was unsinkable. Just as the Titanic sinking went from “impossible” to inevitable, so will the take this job and shove it exodus move from “impossible” to inevitable.

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Posted by Elvis on 10/07/20 •
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Thursday, August 20, 2020

Preying On The Job Seeker 19

Twice the past month on jobs I applied for - one at a good-old American telecommunications company, and the other a city government job - the self-identification page for race threw me for a double-take:

latino2.jpg alt:image job app ethnicity latino or other

The first drop-down box for ethnicity is either “Hispanic/Latino” or “Not Hispanic/Latino.”

latino1.jpg alt:image job app eeo drop-down

Being a red-blooded Caucasian/White American male, born, living and looking for work in the United States, I selected “Not Hispanic or Latino,” then “White,” and finished filling out the forms, which wound up being an utter waste of time.

I got “thanks but no thanks” denial emails minutes after applying, surprised at how fast that was. 

Maybe some MACHINE scanned the forms and found a field or two that automatically disqualified me.

Kinda makes one think that Latinos and Hispanics are the majority workforce, and/or preferred job candidates.

God help the WHITE WORKING MAN.

More Preying on the job seeker articles:

[1] - [2] - [3] - [4] - [5] - [6] - [7] - [8] - [9] - [10] - [11] - [12] - [13] - [14] - [15] - [16] - [17] - [18] - [19]

Posted by Elvis on 08/20/20 •
Section Dying America • Section Workplace • Section Personal
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Monday, November 11, 2019

How Many Good Jobs

no jobs

53 Million Americans Drowning in Cycle of Low-Wage Work
Today’s artificial economy isn’t working for everyone.

By Tyler Durden
Zerohedge
November 9, 2019

It’s the “Greatest Economy Ever,” right? Well, it depends on who you ask.

For instance, a new report sheds light on 53 million Americans, or about 44% of all US workers, aged 18 to 64, are considered low-wage and low-skilled.

Many of these folks are stuck in THE GIG ECONOMY, making approximately $10.22 per hour, and they bring home less than $20,000 per year, according to a Brookings Institution report of these folks are stuck in the gig economy, making approximately $10.22 per hour, and they bring home less than $20,000 per year, ACCORDING TO a Brookings Institution report.

An overwhelmingly large percentage of these folks have insurmountable debts in that of student loans, auto loans, and or credit cards. Their wages don’t cover their debt servicing payments as their lives will be left in financial ruin after the next recession.

While the top 10% of Americans are partying like it’s 1999, most of whom own assets - like stocks, bonds, and real estate - are greatly prospering off the Federal Reserves serial asset bubble-blowing scheme and President Trump’s stock market pumping on Twitter.

Today’s artificial economy isn’t working for everyone as the wealth inequality gap swells to crisis levels.

The US is at the 11th hour, one hour till midnight, as the wealth inequality imbalance will correct itself by the eruption of protests on the streets of major metro areas, sort of like whats been happening across the world in Chile, Hong Kong, Lebanon, and Barcelona.

An uprising, a revolution, people are waking up to the fact that unelected officials and governments have ruined the economy and has resulted in their financial misery of low wages and insurmountable debts.

The report shows almost half of all low-wage workers are clustered in ten occupations, such as a retail salesperson, cooks and food preparation, building cleaners, and construction workers (these are some of the jobs that will get wiped out during the next recession).

10 biggest jobs

Shown below, most of these low-wage workers are centered in areas around the North East, Mid-Atlantic, and Rust Belt.

2019 11 jobs by state

As we’ve detailed in past articles, millions of these low-wage and low-skilled jobs will never be replaced after the next recession, that’s due in part to mega corporations swapping out these jobs with automation and artificial intelligence.

The solution by the government and the Federal Reserve, to avoid riots in the streets, will be the implementation of various forms of quantitative easing for the people.

There’s a reason why you already hear the debate of universal income, central banks starting to finance green investments, and other various forms of short/long term stimulus, that is because the global economy is grinding to a halt - and the only solution at the moment is to do more of the same.

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Posted by Elvis on 11/11/19 •
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Sunday, November 03, 2019

500 Hundred Resumes Later

image: the invisible long-term unemployed

[O]ut-of-work Americans have played a critical role in helping the richest one percent recover trillions in financial wealth.
- Why The Rich Love Unemployment

After saying that “the halls of Congress are no joke,” Ocasio-Cortez said that “standing up to corporate power, and established interests is no joke. It’s not just about standing up and saying these things, but behind closed doors, your arm is twisted, the vise pressure of political pressure gets put on you, every trick in the book, psychological, and otherwise is to get us to abandon the working class.”
- Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

[F]or years the government has been taking large numbers of people from the basket known as “officially unemployed” and dumping them into another basket known as “not in the labor force.” Since those that are “not in the labor force” do not count toward the official unemployment rate, they can make things look better than they actually are by moving people into that category.
- There’s no BS like the BLS

THERE’S NO OTHER WAY TO SAY THIS. The official unemployment rate, which cruelly overlooks the suffering of the long-term and often permanently unemployed as well as the depressingly underemployed, amounts to a Big Lie.

When the media, talking heads, the White House and Wall Street start reporting the truth - the percent of Americans in good jobs; jobs that are full time and real then we will quit wondering why Americans aren’t feeling something that doesn’t remotely reflect the reality in their lives. And we will also quit wondering what hollowed out the middle class.
- Gallup Head Says Unemployment Rate is “A Big Lie.”

This is VERY BAD. These are young men who have given up hope - men who saw no light at the end of the TUNNEL

That’s what happens when all you have is debt and no job prospects.

were all sort of just making time pass until the end. The antidepressants help, but on some level I can’t help feeling like Wellbutrin is only masking a very rational reaction to “modern” life.

Weve created a world so miserable that people prefer death over it.
- Reddit Post

Lots of Job Hunting, but No Job, Despite Low Unemployment
Even with the strongest labor market in half a century, getting work after losing it can still be a challenge.

By Patricia Cohen
NY Times
October 31, 2019

RIVER VALE, N.J.  Laura Ward flipped through the small, lined notebook where she had neatly recorded every job posting she had answered, resume she had sent and application she had completed since being laid off in March 2016.

No. 28 was a job listing for a creative manager at Byre Group posted on the website Indeed.

No. 97 was about a brand marketing administrator job at Benjamin Moore.

No. 109 marketing operations at AMC.

No. 158 an associate project manager at Vitamin Shoppe.

Callbacks were circled in green. Rejections were marked with a red X. Most have neither, signaling no reply one way or the other. Bottled messages dropped in an ocean.

“I had to keep track somehow,” said Ms. Ward, who has maintained job-hunting diaries since the 1990s.

Even in some of the hottest labor markets in the country - let alone lagging rural regions and former industrial powerhouses - workers, including skilled ones like Ms. Ward, say they cannot find jobs that provide a middle-class income and don’t come with an expiration date.

After more than a decade as production manager at a small advertising agency, Ms. Ward was let go after the firm lost a major account. Over the last three and a half years, she has worked temporary stints, and bolstered her skills by taking a project-management course at a nearby college. But she has not been able to find a steady, full-time job.

So for her, the reports of low unemployment rates and employer complaints of labor shortages are puzzling.

I don’t know what all those jobs out there are, she said from her living room in River Vale, a New Jersey suburb within commuting distance of Manhattan.

The continuing strength of the labor market has been one of the most remarkable economic achievements since the recession petered out. A nine-year string of job gains has coaxed discouraged and disabled Americans back into the work force and raised wages and hours, particularly for those at low end of the pay scale.

Beneath the clear benefits of the economic expansion, however, there is an undertow of anxiety, heightened recently by fears of slowing growth around the globe and in the United States.

“We’re not focusing enough on the people who have continued to be left behind by this recovery,” said Martha Gimbel, a manager of economic research at Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic initiative. “We have not talked enough about the workers who are still stuck even in a labor market that is this competitive.”

Most of these people do not show up in the stunningly low official unemployment rate, which was 3.6 percent in October. Working even one hour during the week when the Labor Department does its employment survey keeps you out of the jobless category.

Many more show up in a broader measure, which includes people who are working part time but would prefer full-time employment, and those who want to work but have given up an active job search. That rate in September was 6.9 percent, some 11 million people.

But there are also many others, like Ms. Ward, who work temporary jobs for months at a time and are not necessarily captured in either measure. And millions of contract workers freelancers, consultants, Lyft drivers ח lack benefits, regular schedules and job security. They have found a foothold, but it rests on loose rock.

A recent survey by Gallup found that a majority of Americans do not consider themselves to be in a good job.Ӕ

Appealing to Americans on the sidelinesӔ and those who had not benefited from the so-called recoveryӔ was a key element of Donald Trumps presidential campaign in 2016. Now, Democratic presidential contenders like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are arguing that American workers have barely shared in the economyҒs gains.

And they have bypassed benchmark statistics like the unemployment rate, and focused instead on the systems fundamental unfairness, highlighting stark income inequality and worker rights.

The political pressures have even registered in penthouse suites. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executives of some of the nationҒs biggest corporations, issued a new mission statement in August, declaring that companies should promote the interests of their employees as well as their investors.

We know that many Americans are struggling,Ӕ the group said in a release. Too often hard work is not rewarded, and not enough is being done for workers to adjust to the rapid pace of change in the economy.Ӕ

Such pronouncements have yet to produce a tangible change in many Americans daily lives.

One in four workers say they have unpredictable work schedules, which can have insidious effects on family life. One in five adults who are employed say they want to work more hours. Annual wage growth has struggled to reach 3 percent. And nearly 40 percent of Americans, a Federal Reserve report found, are in such a financially precarious state that they say they would have trouble finding $400 for an unexpected expense like a car repair or a medical bill.

Keenan Harton, 45, juggles two jobs, one at a Biscuitville fast-food restaurant that pays $8 an hour, and another at a hospital laundry in Durham, N.C., that pays $10.50 an hour. Often he shows up for work at the fast-food job for an eight-hour shift, only to be sent home after a couple of hours if business is slow.

ғIts real hard to find a full-time job thatҒs actually going to pay over $10 an hour, said Mr. Harton, who has a high school diploma.

Four hundred fifty miles north, in New Jersey, Sonia JohnsonԒs last job was in August, a four-week assignment. But my last full-time direct hire was back in 2009,Ӕ said Ms. Johnson, who worked in the human resources department of a pharmaceutical company until she was laid off. For me, itӒs been all through an agency, working as a contractor.

Ms. Johnson, 55, who has a college degree, said she had kept her skills up to date by using grant money from the stateԒs labor department to take courses. I have really good technical skills,Ӕ she said.

Asked how many jobs she had applied for, Ms. Johnson hesitated. “It’s almost embarrassing,” she said. “At least 500.”

Her impression is that the contract work that enables her to pay the bills may at times hinder her ability to get a full-time job. ԓEmployers are not happy with people with a contract working background, Ms. Johnson said, adding that they are also suspicious of any gaps in a rԩsum.

National averages, of course, can mask distinct geographical differences. Workers may not have the specific skills a particular employer needs, or live where a job opening is. But research also shows that some employers have a negative view of people who have been unemployed for long stretches at a time.

“The longer you are unemployed, the more stigma is attached,” said Carl Van Horn, the founding director of the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University.

African-Americans and older Americans are more likely to find themselves among the long-term unemployed, he said, a group that includes people out of work for more than six months. And age discrimination, particularly against women over 40, has been documented in several studies.

“There are very limited remedies in this country to deal with these issues,” Mr. Van Horn said. Cash assistance runs out, and there are few retraining opportunities. He noted that a lot of higher education assistance, like Pell Grants, do not pay for short-term training, which is what many people lacking a particular skill could benefit from.

The Heldrich Center runs the New Start Career Network, a program for the long-term unemployed that provides online job-search resources, job fairs and career coaching.

Both Ms. Ward and Ms. Johnson are members, and that is where they learned about the states grants for training.

“Every morning, I wake up and there’s that one second when I realize I don’t have a job, and its scary and awful,” Ms. Ward said.

Holding her notebook in her lap, Ms. Ward slowly ran her finger along the pages of color-coded entries of job leads.

It’s interesting to watch as time went on, she said. As the weeks, and then months went by, her search criteria shifted. “O.K., a little further away, 35 miles instead of 25,” she recalled. “Maybe a little less money, maybe this title instead of that.”

Her cellphone rang, and she excused herself to answer it.

“I applied to these three jobs yesterday, and I thought maybe they’ll call me,” she said when she did not recognize the number. It turned out to be a nuisance call.

Now that three years have passed since her last training, Ms. Ward is again eligible to receive unemployment insurance while taking up to $4,000 worth of classes. She has signed up for a social-media marketing class and an introductory design course.

“That should buy me till the end of the year,” she said.

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Posted by Elvis on 11/03/19 •
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Thursday, September 26, 2019

Ageism

book-im-not-done.jpg a;t=image: book im not done

Is Ageism the Last Socially Acceptable Ism? A New Book Argues Yes

By Nicole Cardos
WTTW
April 25, 2019

As many as 25,000 complaints claiming age discrimination have been filed each year since 2008, according to the U.S. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION.

That’s one of the reasons why PATTI TEMPLE ROCKS, a senior partner and head of client engagement at marketing agency ICF Next, calls ageism the last socially acceptable “ism” in our culture.

“We should talk about it. It’s the one ‘ism that will ultimately affect us all,” she said. “We’re all going to get old, were all going to age.”

Temple Rocks makes the case for increased awareness about ageism and age discrimination in her new book, I’M NOT DONE: IT’S TIME TO TALK ABOUT AGEISM IN THE WORKPLACE

The book details stories of employees in their 40s, 50s and 60s who’ve experienced ageism in the workplace, and tips for business leaders who wish to address it.

Temple Rocks joins us in discussion. 

Below, an excerpt from “I’m Not Done”

Chapter 4: The Dollars & Sense of Ageism in the Workplace

The other type of age discrimination claim turns on wrongful termination. Wrongful termination isn’t always a clearly identifiable firing or layoff. More commonly, its the “make them so miserable they will quit” approach, which I’ve discussed previously. This can take many forms, such as excluding an older worker from some meetings all of a sudden, giving younger workers plum assignments, better sales territories, or better technology, and making an older worker feel forced to accept a role that isn’t a good fit. If there is a pattern of such behavior, it can be interpreted as age discrimination.

Employers take this approach because they don’t want to fire the older worker and hope that either the older worker will solve the problem for them by quitting. Sometimes they use the “miserable job” as a place to put a worker they deem disposable. More often than not, this is an older employee. One gentleman I spoke with had this happen to him; in the back of his mind, he knew the company wanted him to leave for financial reasons, but he needed the job. As such, when he was asked to take the “miserable job,” he said yes. After many months, he asked for a change, and he was told by HR, “Well, you lasted a lot longer than we thought you would!” That was followed by HR telling him there was no other suitable role, so they would accept his resignation.

This type of ageism is often preceded by psychological damage and general diminishment of the person. Back to my ever-so-wise attorney friend Sue Ellen, who observed:

All of sudden, once-valued employees feel less valued they are forced into a role that no longer utilizes their strengths, they aren’t invited to key meetings, they are literally and figuratively being muted if not silenced, and it can become a self-defeating cycle because the natural reaction when this happens is to doubt yourself when in reality nothing has changed about your abilities as much as the organization’s natural inclination to gravitate towards the next shiny thing. And once that starts to happen to someone it can really wear them down, so this idea of leaving either voluntarily or not - starts to sound like a plausible idea.

This is essentially what is meant by the infamous phrase “put out to pasture,” and it happens much more often to older workers. They are just not involved in the way that they used to be involved, so it becomes this self-defeating cycle of yuck. Because if you’re not in the thick of things, your opinions are not going to be as well-informed. Then when you do get the chance to participate or give an opinion, it might not be as savvy or as spot-on as it used to be because you have started to doubt yourself and your ability to deliver value.

As humans, we are at our happiest when we feel involved, valued, and needed. When you no longer feel that in your workplace, particularly as an older worker who has been invested in a career for 30 or 40 years, it feels almost like a loss of identity. It’s almost like the stories you hear of one spouse dying followed quickly by the other. And after interviewing dozens of people, I can confirm that it hurts. A lot. Their hurt was palpable in each and every one of my interviews.

It’s a real ego blow to be treated this way. It’s hurtful. These are people who have spent most of their careers being highly valued, and then they all of a sudden get to a place where they start to wonder, when did I become invisible?

I think that’s partly why I opted to move on when I experienced this myself. I got some really good advice from a senior-level recruiter who I’ve known for a long time: he said, “The minute it [staying in the job] starts to erode your self-confidence, you have to get out of there.”

“I’m blessed with a fair degree of self-confidence, and it’s a lot easier for me than I think it is for a lot of people. I was also in a position where I could quitthat’s not true for everyone.”

Age discrimination also takes a heavier toll than other forms of discrimination on the health of victims. Boomers who want to keep working often need the income and health insurance that comes with full-time employment. Taking that away from them places a greater burden on public resources. In a statistic that shocked and horrified me, according to the AARP, those who lose their jobs past age 58 are at the greatest health risk, and on average, lose three years of life expectancy if they dont find another job.

A work study conducted by AARP in 2017 found that age is the leading reason for negative treatment by an employer. Participants were asked: “Thinking about how you are personally treated in the workplace, would you say the following generally caused your employer to treat you better, worse or no differently: age, race/ ethnicity, gender, disability, sexual orientation, religion, veteran status? Notably, age was the leading reason, and it was nearly double race and more than double gender. This underscores the negative psychological and physical effects experienced by older workers subject to age discrimination.

SOURCE

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Has the Law Evolved Enough To Combat Pervasive Age Discrimination?
While #MeToo has become a large focus in corporate America, the law surrounding age discrimination and the HURDLES TO LITIGATION are largely ignored.

By Kathryn Barcroft
Law Dot Com
September 11, 2019

Activist organizations have been hard at work studying the pervasiveness of age discrimination in corporate America and have noted the difficult legal standards to prove it, which leave many workers without options in the workplace after a certain age. While #MeToo has become a large focus in corporate America, the law surrounding age discrimination and the hurdles to litigation are largely ignored. The issue is of particular importance as employees are living longer and choose or need to work later in life, rather than having the means to retire with a sizeable pension. The realities of age discrimination are a real concern for all races and genders in the workforce as they plan their careers and are sometimes illegally forced to leave a company due to age discrimination.

Ageism is a worldwide problem that can affect the employment status of older workers. The issue has garnered the attention of the World Health Organization (WHO), an organization that has noted in relation to their upcoming study on ageism that “age discrimination is an incredibly prevalent and insidious problem.” Paula Spain, Ageism: A Prevalent and Insidious Health Threat, New York Times (April 26, 2019). Further, unlike other forms of discrimination - [it] is socially accepted and usually unchallenged, because of its largely implicit and subconscious nature. Alana Officer and VԢnia de la Fuente-Nuez, A global campaign to combat ageism, World Health Organization (March 9, 2018). A full report on WHO’s findings is anticipated in 2020.

SOURCE

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“Astonishing Statistic” In New Workhuman Employee Survey, What Is Driving Discrimination

By Sheila Callaham - Contributor Diversity & Inclusion
Forbes
September 4, 2019

Today the Workhuman Analytics & Research Institute released its 2019 INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYEE SURVEY REPORT on factors contributing to job satisfaction, flight risk and emotional engagement. The institute collaborates with leaders in the human resources industry and global research experts to publish original research on current trends that affect and influence the employee experience, culture management, and leadership. The eleventh deployment since its launch in 2011, feedback was comprised of 3,573 randomly selected fully employed individuals in the U.S., U.K, Canada and Ireland.

While many of the responses were consistent with trending, one new finding is profound. The survey reports that one in four workers (26%) have felt discriminated against over the course of their career. When asked the main reason for feelings of discrimination, more than half (52%) cited age. Other factors included gender identity (30%), race (29%), political views (20%) and sexual orientation (9%).

Ageism and age discrimination have grown over the last five years to take the top spot for discrimination in the workplace. “That is just an astonishing statistic,” said Eric Mosley, CEO and Cofounder of WORKHUMAN (formerly known as Globoforce), whose mission it is to help forward-thinking companies energize their cultures, unlock their employees passion and potential and unite their workforce around a shared purpose.

“We weren’t surprised that workers want meaningful work, compensation and perks and to feel appreciated for their contributions. We weren’t surprised about discrimination in the workplace, especially around gender inequity. But it is alarming to know that age is the number one reason why more than half of those reporting feel discriminated against.”
- Eric Mosley, CEO and Cofounder, Workhuman

Mosley believes that people are more willing to speak about ageism in the workplace now than ever before, which is exactly what is needed to instigate change. “Publicizing ageism is a good thing because getting these issues out into the open and giving them a little bit of oxygen, will hopefully move the ball forward in redressing”, said Mosley.

The report also cites toxic work culture (40%) as the top reason for employees feeling unsafe at work. Mosley suggests distrust, discrimination and negativity create an environment where people don’t trust each other, their managers or their leadership. “Research shows that with increased recognition, appreciation and gratitude, civility increases. And when civility increases, toxicity is reduced.”

Finally, gender inequities continue to pervade organizations with men being twice as likely to be in a senior management or executive role. Moreover, more than half of women in middle and front-line management positions say a manager has taken credit for their work. And one in three women surveyed has experienced some form of discrimination.

On the positive side, the report indicates the most important factor in people’s careers is finding meaningful work. On the downside, certain segments of the workforce feel discriminated against and don’t get the credit they deserve.

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 09/26/19 •
Section Revelations • Section Dying America • Section Workplace
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