Article 43

 

Job Hunt

Monday, September 19, 2022

Preying On The Job Seeker 20 - Ghost Jobs

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Applicants say they’re being ghosted by recruiters, having their resumes eliminated by applicant tracking systems (ATS), and struggling to find remote work opportunities. At the same time, unemployment benefits have been cut off.

By the end of September, Holz had sent out 60 applications, received 16 email responses, four follow-up phone calls, and [one] solitary interview.
- Job Hunting 2021

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That’s not a real job opening
Some companies are posting ‘ghost jobs’ but don’t actually plan to hire you - or anyone

By Rebecca Knight and Juliana Kaplan
Business Insider
September 18, 2022

· The number of job openings has been sky high over the past year in the red-hot labor market.

· But some job seekers are still striking out, especially as the economy faces headwinds.

· That could be because some firms are posting “ghost jobs” that they’re not actually hiring for.

After applying to more than 300 jobs in the last six months without a single bite, Will no longer bothers to read job descriptions or research companies.

It’s just a waste of time at this point, said Will, whose real name is withheld but known to Insider.

He spends six to 10 hours a day on LinkedIn churning out applications, but says that he and his peers with similar credentials master’s degrees and MBAs from top schools - are having no luck getting interviews.

“I’m seeing all of these articles about how COMPANIES CANNOT RECRUIT PEOPLE fast enough and how there’s all these job openings,” said Will, who aims to land a consulting role. “But I’m also seeing my own personal experience and seeing other highly qualified candidates who can’t get interviews or can’t get jobs and I’m like, ‘Something is wrong with the system.’”

It is a puzzle in this remarkably tight labor market. While many EMPLOYERS CAN’T FIND ENOUGH WORKERS, some qualified candidates are applying to open jobs and AREN’T HEARING ANYTHING BACK.

That applicants are, on occasion, GHOSTED BY EMPLOYERS is nothing new, of course. But lately questions have been raised about whether a company’s job postings are reflective of actual open positions, or instead “ghost jobs” listings that employers are no longer actively hiring or recruiting for.

According to a RECENT SURVEY of roughly 1,000 hiring managers conducted by Clarify Capital, a boutique lending firm, 40% of managers have had a job posting open for over two to three months; one in five managers said they don’t plan to fill their current open job positions until 2023; and half of managers said they keep job postings up because they’re “always open to new people,” even if they’re not actively recruiting.

“We have over 150 million people working in the US economy,” Kathryn Edwards, an economist at the RAND Corporation, told Insider about the GREAT RESIGNATION. “Whatever can be true is true for at least one person. Having that many workers means that you can have two true stories that are in absolute conflict, and it totally makes sense that they’re both in our labor market.”

SOME RESEARCHERS SAY that “job openings” might mean something different today than it used to, and that companies routinely ADJUST TO FORCES in the economy and their industries by ramping up and down the intensity with which they recruit. OTHERS, MEANWHILE, HAVE SPECULATED that companies today are posting jobs but not trying hard to fill them, perhaps due to uncertainties about the economy. But at a time when many workers are still QUITTING THEIR JOBS AT ELEVATED RATES emboldened by the apparent strength of the labor market, the ghost job phenomenon underscores the idea that EMPLOYERS STILL HAVE THE UPPER HAND.

“Evergreen" postings in an uncertain environment

There are many reasons why companies might post vacancies with seemingly little urgency to fill them, recruiters say. Sometimes they want to give the impression that the company is growing ח but in an inflationary economy, growth is expensive, so they’re hedging their bets.

Sometimes they leave listings open with dreams that the perfect, unicorn candidate might apply. Other times they might post jobs to pacify their exhausted employees and demonstrate that they are indeed at least trying to hire more help.

There are also some jobs that are so in-demand think: mobile developers and software engineers ח that employers might leave up openings in hopes that someone, anyone will apply.

Allyn Bailey, a former recruiting strategy executive at Intel and now a director at Smart Recruiters, a talent sourcing and hiring platform, said that companies are more often posting “evergreen requisitions” listings for jobs that, in theory, they always need even if they don’t have the budget to hire. “That way they have a pipeline to leverage when they’re ready,” she said.

Of course, candidates don’t know that. They apply in good faith, ignorant of this strategy, and when the company eventually calls them, she said, “the talent is either not interested, has moved on, or is annoyed.”

Some recruiters say that ghost jobs are on the rise due to the heightened level of uncertainty that’s persisted for the past two and a half years. With the ENDURING LABOR SHORTAGE and high turnover, they can no longer accurately predict candidate behavior and flow. That, combined with a slowing economy, has created an air of tentativeness.

“The companies I talk to are struggling with how they think about HOW TO GET STRATEGIC WORK DONE because the contours of their business are changing rapidly,” said Pat Pettiti, CEO of Catalant, the online platform that connects independent consultants for projects at large corporations.

“They don’t understand who or what they need - and so they’re hesitating when it comes to hiring.”

Moreover, fears of a looming recession have made them hesitant to commit. “That’s why you have some managers thinking, ‘My boss told me to hire someone, but am I going to have to lay them off in three months?’”

William Stonehouse, the president of Crawford Thomas Recruiting, the Orlando staffing firm that matches jobseekers with Fortune 1000 companies, said that he often coaches employers on the perils of posting ghost jobs.

“A lot of businesses don’t understand the impact that a negative hiring process can have on future applicants,” he said. “If your listings are a graveyard of old positions and candidates are uploading applications into a resume black hole, it doesn’t set a good tone. People want to be treated with dignity and respect.”

“There are too many jobs posted”

Andrew Flowers, a labor economist at Appcast, the recruitment advertising technology company, expressed skepticism that “ghost jobs” are a widespread problem. “Some employers no doubt are fishing they have a job opening, but aren’t planning to hire - but I think this is a small minority of employers,” he said in an email interview with Insider.

Flowers pointed out thatings in each month, rem the overall job fill rate, the ratio of hires to openains very low, which reflects the tight labor market. Meanwhile, other economic research shows that recruiting intensity matters less for the job search-and-matching process than factors like candidate skills and quality and the macroeconomic environment.

“It seems plausible that the job openings figures overstate the amount of active recruitment going on, and perhaps by more than in the past,” he said. “But it’s also very clear that there are lots of openings right now.”

“When employers first started grumbling about a labor shortage,” Erica Groshen, a senior economics advisor at the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations and former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, was a little suspicious of the high number of job openings. But as she watched wages rise and job switching soar, she was sold on the phenomenon of real hiring.

Even so, “the advent of the internet means that applying for jobs is much easier,” Groshen told Insider.

“You can apply to so many more jobs, which then means that companies have to SORT THROUGH SO MANY APPLICATIONS many more than they ever used to before - which means that they employ algorithms to do this sorting,” Groshen said. “Those algorithms are going to be fairly crude.”

The number of openings and ease of applying are cold comfort for Will, who’s still fruitlessly job hunting day after day. For jobseekers like him, who come in with degrees and specific qualifications, the reality might have to be abandoning those ghost jobs altogether and seeking out poorer matches. After all, about a third of college graduates are underemployed, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, meaning that they’re in roles that don’t typically require a degree.

That’s because, even as workers are in a red hot labor market, they still don’t have the upper hand when it comes to work. Because workers in the US ultimately need a job to eat, pay for housing, and have health insurance, employers have what’s called monopsony power, which allows them to dictate wages, working conditions, and scheduling and it lets them post jobs they might never fill or accidentally filter the right candidates out of.

“There are too many jobs posted, he said. And the “websites - some of them are just broken and some just don’t work. It’s almost comical.”

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Posted by Elvis on 09/19/22 •
Section Dealing with Layoff • Section Job Hunt • Section Preying On The Job Seeker
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Sunday, October 10, 2021

NWO - Job Hunting 2021

image: job search

OBAMA’S BIGGEST BLEMISH remains the ongoing tragedy of mass unemployment. Not only does this have a human element - the countless lives harmed or destroyed by poverty and desperation - but it is a huge drag on our economy. Mass unemployment reduces spending - the engine of our economy - which in turn, reduces growth. And without meaningful growth, there’s no way to reduce long-term debt without inflicting a large dose of harmful austerity. That, in my view, is unacceptable.
Obama’s Biggest Blemish, January 3,2013

AFTER THE 2007-09 FINANCIAL CRISIS, the imbalances and risks pervading the global economy were exacerbated by policy mistakes. So, rather than address the structural problems that the financial collapse and ensuing recession revealed, governments mostly kicked the can down the road, creating major downside risks that made another crisis inevitable. And now that it has arrived, the risks are growing even more acute.

“The death of smaller businesses means that the big players in the stock market are anticipating a bumper year, full of bailouts and tax cuts and then austerity when convenient,” says Suresh Naidu, an economist at Columbia University who studies labor and inequality.

The coronavirus forced our entire economy onto life support from the federal government. Instead of choosing to support everyone during this temporary shutdown - guaranteeing the incomes of workers, instituting widespread debt relief, and pouring stimulus money directly into the base of the wealth pyramid, which supports everything else, the government has instead done what it is built to do: protect the biggest businesses and the accumulated wealth of the richest people, herding societys most powerful into an economic fortress, content in the knowledge that high unemployment and austerity for local governments will just create a population desperate to work for even lower wages than before. As the Trump administration pled helplessness over the fact that we have no good system for delivering money directly to individuals, it did not need to say that that, itself, is a policy choice that is now serving its intended purpose.
The Disconnect Between the Stock Market and the Real Economy Is Destroying Our Lives, may 5, 2020

[L]abour’s share of income is going to continue its downward trend after the current crisis ends. Aside from the profit incentive that has always existed to motivate automation, this crisis has highlighted the pandemic risks associated with relying on labour availability. Industries that employed millions of people pre-pandemic, such as accommodation and food service, as well as retailers, will take advantage of the technological advances in the coming years, suggesting that the so-called “jobless recovery” we saw after the Great Financial Crisis might end up proving to have been an absolute.
The ‘jobless recovery’ after the financial crisis is going to look like a labour bonanza compared with what’s coming next , February 2021

Confessions of job hunters: 5 people open up about their frustrations, from getting ghosted by recruiters to sending out 300 resumes with no response

By Jenny Powers
Business Insider
October 7, 2021

DESPITE REPORTS that there are more available jobs in America than people to fill them, people all over the country say actually getting hired is a different story.

Applicants say they’re being ghosted by recruiters, having their rsums eliminated by applicant tracking systems (ATS), and struggling to find remote work opportunities. At the same time, unemployment benefits have been cut off.

From graduate students to those looking for post-retirement work, Insider spoke with five people who are currently unemployed to learn what it’s like job-hunting during one of the worst times in economic history.

Here’s what they had to say:

Lauren Daly, 30, Henderson, Nevada

Due to a company restructure, I got laid off two weeks ago from my job as a sales rep in educational technology, and received two months severance.

The irony is in addition to that job, I teach an online course I created for a university focusing on career preparedness, covering everything from cover letters, rsums, interview tips, and how best to use LinkedIn to navigate the job search.

When I told my students I got laid off they asked, “How could you be out of work? You literally teach a class on getting jobs!” I resisted the impulse to say maybe I should create a class on how to keep jobs.

I assumed with my PhD and experience, I wouldn’t have a hard time breaking into the scrum master field I wanted to be in but right now, the market is insane. No one is ever really safe.

So far, five different recruiters have reached out claiming to have the ‘perfect fit’ for me, but I’ve been ghosted by all of them.

Bilal Waheed, 29, Astoria, New York

I’ve spent my life following an imaginary checklist based on societal and family expectations, but now that I’ve checked the required boxes, I’m in limbo.

My parents are Pakistani immigrants who always stressed the importance of higher education. I earned my Bachelor’s, worked for four years, then went to grad school for a Masters in applied statistics.

But since graduating in May and sending out nearly 70 applications for data science and analysis positions, I haven’t had a single interview and feel lost in a sea of other applicants. Dealing with so much rejection has been tough.

My savings ran out so I just applied for unemployment. I have $120,000 in student debt, so that’s another battle to face.

I wish I’d been better prepared to build up a network and leverage social capital like some of my classmates had been doing.

My dream is to work in data science for Spotify, but right now I don’t need to strive for the big-name jobs. I’m not ashamed to work my way up.

Donna Fields Brown, 70, Pearce, Arizona

I’m a retired RN looking for part-time work to supplement my social security income (SSI).

Working for over 30 years, I never truly found my niche and did a lot of job-hopping, but jobs were also plentiful back then.

In 2017, my husband and I retired, sold our house, and traveled across the country for two years in our 23-foot long travel trailer. We quickly discovered life on the road was more expensive than we thought.

When the pandemic hit, I took a part-time position as a Walmart cashier to supplement my SSI, but left after a month. Since then, I’ve applied for several jobs at Target, Safeway, and a nearby national park but I haven’t gotten any responses.

I don’t know what’s more daunting, filling out applications online or trying to find work in my ‘Golden Years.’ I’d have to say that both feel like full-time jobs.

Amanda Dexter, 35, Wathena, Kansas

I was an English teacher for seven years but left the field in April after experiencing complete burnout. I was offered a teaching contract this year but turned it down for the sake of my mental health.

I started applying for work two months prior to quitting my teaching job. I’d heard all these reports about how many jobs were opening up, so I thought I’d have no trouble finding one pretty quickly.

But it’s now seven months later and I’ve had no luck when it comes to jobs outside of classroom teaching. It seems like I can’t ever get my foot past the front door.

Personally, I think my resume is getting weeded out by applicant tracking systems before it can even be seen by a human. ATS software only scans for relevant keywords and job titles. When the system reviews my resume, all they see is ‘teaching’ and ‘education,’ not all of the transferable skills that an actual human would recognize as part of my work experience.

For example, I’m an experienced content writer and have applied to a variety of content writing jobs, but on the surface to an ATS, it looks like I have no applicable experience. A human would understand that an English teacher would be a strong writer or at least have some of the skills and potential for the job. Even applying to something like secretarial work seems hopeless because my rsum doesn’t include the types of keywords an ATS is scanning for.

I’ve tried LinkedIn Premium and even got a $29.99 a month subscription for a career coaching company called Work It Daily. I followed their resume templates which focus on getting past the ATS and being easily navigable for recruiters and HR staff. I even had one of their coaches review my resume to make sure it all looked right. While I have noticed a slight uptick based on my revised format, it hasn’t yielded a full-time opportunity yet.

It’s been incredibly defeating receiving rejection after rejection or being ghosted altogether.

Caitlin Tolchin, 38, New York City

I was laid off from my role as an art director in April 2020, a week after finding out I was pregnant with our first child. Recruiters said no one would hire someone that needed maternity leave so soon after starting, so I temporarily paused my job search.

Our daughter is now 10 months old and my unemployment just ran out. Over the past four months, I’ve applied to approximately 300 positions and only received five or six callbacks, all of which were for in-person jobs which is too big of a COVID risk right now with a baby in the house.

I want to return to work in a remote, freelance or project-based position with the possibility of a hybrid schedule down the line.

For now, I’m going to continue my search and in the meantime, I plan on taking classes to build up my skills in the hopes of becoming more marketable.

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A worker in Florida applied to 60 entry-level jobs in September and got one interview

By Dominick Reuter
Business Insider
October 19.2021

Joey Holz recalled first hearing complaints about a labor shortage last year when he called to donate convalescent plasma at a clinic near Fort Myers, Florida.

“The guy went on this rant about how he can’t find help and he can’t keep anybody in his medical facility because they all quit over the stimulus checks,” Holz told Insider. “And I’m like, ‘Your medical professionals quit over $1,200 checks? That’s weird.’”

Over the next several months, he watched as a growing chorus of businesses said they COULDN’T FIND ANYONE TO HIRE because of government stimulus money. It was so ubiquitous that he joined a “No one wants to work” Facebook group, where users made memes deriding frustrated employers.

He said he found it hard to believe that government money was keeping people out of the labor force, especially when the end of expanded federal unemployment benefits did not seem to trigger a surge in employment. The expanded benefits ended in September, but 26 states ended them early in June and July.

“If this extra money that everyone’s supposedly living off of stopped in June and it’s now September, obviously, that’s not what’s stopping them,” he said. Workers have said companies struggling to hire aren’t offering competitive pay and benefits.

So Holz, a former food-service worker and charter-boat crewman, decided to run an experiment.

On September 1, he sent job applications to a pair of restaurants that had been particularly public about their staffing challenges.

Then, he widened the test and spent the remainder of the month applying to jobs mostly at employers vocal about a “lack of workers” and tracking his journey in a spreadsheet.

Two weeks and 28 applications later, he had just nine email responses, one follow-up phone call, and one interview with a construction company that advertised a full-time job focused on site cleanup paying $10 an hour.

But Holz said the construction company instead tried to offer Florida’s minimum wage of $8.65 to start, even though the wage was scheduled to increase to $10 an hour on September 30. He added that it wanted full-time availability, while scheduling only part time until Holz gained seniority.

Holz said he wasn’t applying for any roles he didn’t qualify for.

Some jobs “wanted a high-school diploma,” he said. “Some wanted retail experience,” he added. “Most of them either said ‘willing to train’ or ‘minimum experience,’ and none of them were over $12 an hour.”

He said: “I didn’t apply for anything that required a degree. I didn’t apply for anything that said ‘must have six months experience in this thing.’”

Holz isn’t alone. Others have also spoken out about their troubles finding work, despite the seemingly tight labor market.

In a Facebook post on September 29, which went viral on Twitter and Reddit as well, Holz said, “58 applications says y’all aren’t desperate for workers, you just miss your slaves.”

“My opinion is that this is a familiar story to many,” he added.

By the end of September, Holz had sent out 60 applications, received 16 email responses, four follow-up phone calls, and the solitary interview. He shared a pie chart showing his results.

Holz acknowledged that his results may not be representative of the larger labor challenges in the country, since his search was local and targeted the most vocal critics of stimulus spending.

He added that despite the claims of some businesses struggling to hire, his boss had no staffing issues during the pandemic.

“Nobody leaves those positions because he takes care of his people,” Holz said, referring to his boss.

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Posted by Elvis on 10/10/21 •
Section Revelations • Section NWO • Section Job Hunt • Section Dying America • Section Next Recession, Next Depression
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Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Senior Community Service Employment Program

image: no job

Over 55, Unemployed and Looking for Work?

For more than 50 years, the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) has provided older adults 55 and older with opportunities to fill entry- and mid-level positions with employers in their local communities. AARP Foundation SCSEP has successfully moved thousands of older job seekers into jobsproviding them with opportunities to use their skills while also offering valuable work experience.

Interested in Becoming a SCSEP Participant?

Call 855-850-2525. 

How it Works

AARP Foundations SCSEP program provides both community service and work-based training.

Working an average of 20 hours a week, older job seekers are paid the highest of federal, state or local minimum wage and are compensated by SCSEP directly. The job seekers are placed in a wide variety of community service activities at non-profit and public facilities like day care centers, senior centers, schools and hospitals. This on-the-job training experience can then be used as a bridge to find employment opportunities outside of the program.

Who’s Eligible?

To participate, you must be:

Age 55 or older

Unemployed

Financially qualified

AARP FoundationҒs SCSEP program (CFDA 17.235) is funded with $77,808,096 million in grants with U.S. Department of Labor funds. This funding provides 90% of the support for SCSEP, with AARP Foundation matching 10% ($8.774,913 million). AARP Foundation operates in 19 states and Puerto Rico.

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Online SCSEP Application Information

Below is the link for you to start your Online Application:

https://www.scsep.org/OnlineApplication

BEFORE YOU BEGIN: A critical part of the application is uploading copies of documents that will be used to determine income eligibility.  Therefore, prior to starting the application, be sure to have copies of your income documents from the last 12 months scanned onto your computer or phone FOR EACH FAMILY MEMBER IN YOUR HOME and ready to upload to your application:

1. Pay Stubs or other documents showing earnings received each month for the last 12 months
2. Social Security Statements for the current and previous year
3. Pension Statements
4. Annuities
5. Veteran Payments
6. Disability Statements (Ex. Social Security Disability ..SSDI)
7. Public Assistance documents (Unemployment Compensation, Public Housing, Medicaid, SNAP, Supplemental Security Income)
8. Any other source of family household income for the last 12 months

After you complete the Online SCSEP Application, you will be contacted by an AARP Foundation SCSEP representative from the local office within 5 to 10 business days to discuss and complete your application.  If you have any specific question regarding the documents you need to collect, please writethose questions down ask those questions to the AARP Foundation SCSEP Representative when they call you back.

During the call back, if you are determined to be income eligible, the AARP Foundation SCSEP Representative will continue completing a full application with you.  As part of the full application, you will also need to provide copies of:

A) Driver’s License or State ID
B) Social Security Card
C) DD214 (If you are a veteran)
D) A voided check from your checking account that will be used to set up your Direct Deposit

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Not Eligible-Due to County of Residence

If you reside in a county that is not serviced by AARP Foundation,you can visit the link below to find the organization that offers the SCSEP in your county:

https://www.careeronestop.org/LocalHelp/EmploymentAndTraining/find-older-worker-programs.aspx

Click on the link below to see if AARP Foundation Back to Work 50+ can assist you.

https://www.aarpfoundation.org/backtowork

Click on the link below to search for free or reduced cost services like medical care, food, job training, and more.

https://local.aarpfoundation.org/

Posted by Elvis on 09/22/21 •
Section Dealing with Layoff • Section Job Hunt
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Monday, April 26, 2021

Down Skilling

image: jobs

I think it’s great if companies stop complaining that we’re TOO STUPID for the jobs out there, stop INSISTING ON DEGREES to apply for jobs pouring coffee, or insinuate that we’re LAZY BUMS that would rather starve than work.

It BEATS THE USUAL threats of outsourcing, offshoring, REPLACING AMERICAN WORKERS with robots or H1-B visas, or the lie we’ve been hearing for years about a SKILLS MISMATCH.

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Employers Eager to Hire Try a New Policy: No Experience Necessary
Inexperienced job applicants face better odds in the labor market as more companies drop work-history and degree requirements

By Kelsey Gee
Wall Street Journal
July 29, 2018

Americans looking to land a first job or break into a dream career face their best odds of success in years.

Employers say they are abandoning preferences for college degrees and specific skill sets to speed up hiring and broaden the pool of job candidates. Many companies added requirements to job postings after the recession, when millions were out of work and human-resources departments were stacked with resumes.

Across incomes and industries, the lower bar to getting hired is helping self-taught programmers attain software engineering roles at Intel Corp. INTC 0.63% and GitHub Inc., the coding platform, and improving the odds for high-school graduates who aspire to be branch managers at Bank of America Corp. BAC 1.20% and Terminix pest control.

“Candidates have so many options today, said Amy Glaser, senior vice president of Adecco Group, a staffing agency with about 10,000 company clients in search of employees. “If a company requires a degree, two rounds of interviews and a test for hard SKILLS, candidates can go down the street to another employer who will make them an offer that day.”

Ms. Glaser estimates one in four of the agency’s employer clients have made drastic changes to their recruiting process since the start of the year, such as skipping drug tests or criminal background checks, or removing preferences for a higher degree or high-school diploma.

Cutting job-credential requirements is more common in cities such as Dallas and Louisville, where unemployment is lowest, Ms. Glaser said, as well as in recruiting for roles at call centers and warehouses within logistics operations of retailers such as Walmart Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.

In the first half of 2018, the share of job postings requesting a college degree fell to 30% from 32% in 2017, according to an analysis by labor-market research firm Burning Glass Technologies of 15 million ads on websites such as Indeed and Craigslist. Minimum qualifications have been drifting lower since 2012, when companies sought college graduates for 34% of those positions.

Long work-history requirements have also relaxed: Only 23% of entry-level jobs now ask applicants for three or more years of experience, compared with 29% back in 2012, putting an additional 1.2 million jobs in closer reach of more applicants, Burning Glass data show. Through the end of last year, a further one million new jobs were opened up to candidates with no experience necessary,Ӕ making occupations such as e-commerce analyst, purchasing assistant and preschool teacher available to novices and those without a degree.

It all marks a sharp reversal from the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis, when employers could be pickier. Economists say job requirements were harder to track then, because many companies didn’t post positions publicly and many resums werent delivered electronically.

Now, recruiters say, the tightest job market in decades has left employers looking to tamp down hiring costs with three options: Offer more money upfront, lower their standards or retrain current staff in coding, procurement or other necessary skills.

Rodney Apple, president of SCM Talent Group LLC in Asheville, N.C., said if companies won’t budge on compensation, experience or education requirements, he walks away.

We tell them,"I’m sorry, but we can’t help you fish for the few underpaid or unaware applicants left out there,” he said. SCM finds workers for dozens of small and midsize companies seeking supply-chain managers and logistics and warehouse operators across the U.S. Mr. Apple said talent shortages are more extreme than he has seen in nearly 20 years of recruiting.

Average wages have climbed steadily in the past year, but rising prices of household goods have made those pay raises less valuable to workers, keeping pressure on employers to increase salaries or re-evaluate their target hire.

To attract more entry-level employees, toy maker Hasbro Inc. HAS -1.20% divided four marketing jobs, which it previously designed for business-school graduates with M.B.A.s, into eight lower-level positions. The new full-time roles included a marketing coordinator, retail-planning analyst and trade merchandiser, all involving more routine activities supporting higher-level staff in the division.

Hasbro hiring managers originally sought candidates with a two-year degree for the jobs but ultimately dropped any college requirement, a spokeswoman said. The Pawtucket, R.I. company received more than 100 applications and hired nine people.

The new shift, called down skilling, bolsters a theory articulated by Alicia Modestino, a Northeastern University economist: When more people are looking for work, companies can afford to inflate job requirements to find the best fitand did so as unemployment spiked in 2008.

As college graduates and midcareer professionals raised their hands for jobs as hotel managers and bookkeepers after the recession, hires with more qualifications took a larger share of positions normally filled by the 75 million U.S. workers who lack a college degree.

After the recession, Terminix raised the bar for over 1,000 pest-control branch- and service-manager positions to require a two-year degree or a bachelor’s degree. In January, it reversed course and made degrees “preferred” but not mandatory, said Betsy Vincent, senior director of talent acquisition.

Anthony Whitehead worked for five years as a Terminix branch manager in Florida before he was promoted to regional director in early July. That position now accepts candidates with college degrees or equivalent experience, helping Mr. Whitehead clinch the role despite his earlier decision to enter the military instead of college.

Mr. Whitehead, 35 years old, said his approach to jobs requiring a degree has been apply anyways if I have the right experience, and then have the education conversation “if I need to,” he said, acknowledging his luck in working for companies like Terminix with flexible requirements.

A lot of employers are loosening college requirements even as the proportion of Americans with a bachelors degree continues to rise. Bank of America Corp. currently has 7,500 job openings world-wide and fewer than 10% require a degree, said spokesman Andy Aldridge. Mr. Aldridge said a surprising number of jobs could be filled by nongraduates, including most of the bank’s tellers and employees handling customer-service and fraud-protection calls from cardholders.

In June, the bank unveiled plans to hire 10,000 more retail workers from low-income neighborhoods over the next five years, with or without degrees, said Chris Payton, head of talent acquisition.

Not every company is relaxing requirements: Economists say positions that require high levels of technical expertise, such as information security, still need advanced knowledge.

The tech industry has been quick to dismiss credentials like a bachelor of arts degree as irrelevant, especially in emerging fields such as data analytics, where demand for talent has risen faster than universities can churn out new graduates.

GitHub, recently acquired by Microsoft Corp., said it hasn’t required college degrees for most positions in years. Degrees are optional for many ‘experienced’ hire positions at chip maker Intel, which also has a ‘tech’ grad job category the company describes as fitting candidates with relevant classroom or work experience from technical programs, such as coding boot camps.

Intel’s career website advertises roles, including a lab employee testing experimental devices in Santa Clara, Calif., and a components researcher improving the semiconductor process in Hillsboro, Ore., as available to candidates with a two-year degree, military training or other nondegree certifications.

Write to Kelsey Gee at kelsey dot gee at wsj dot com

SOURCE

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Employers toss out degree requirements as college costs rise

By Stephanie Ruhle
MSNBC
April 26, 2021

The price tag on a college degree continues to rise, and more companies say the cost isn’t worth it to have a successful career. Stephanie Ruhle reports on employers’ recent moves to abandon degree requirements and even pay to train workers without college educations. Northeastern University Executive Professor of Educational Policy Sean Gallagher and Vice President of Grow with Google Lisa Gevelber join to discuss the shift.

SOURCE - VIDEO

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Grow With Google
Indeed
Updated April 26, 2021

GROW WITH GOOGLE offers classes online only. This school offers training in 2 qualifications, with the most reviewed qualifications being Google IT Support Professional and Google IT Support Professional Certification. Time to complete this education training ranges from 2 months to 2 months depending on the qualification, with a median time to complete of 1 year. The cost to attend Grow with Google is $49. When asked how they paid for their training, most reviewers responded, “I paid for it myself”.

The most commonly reported benefits of attending Grow with Google are “Flexible class hours” and “Affordable”, but respondents also mentioned “Good teachers” and “Helpful career services” as notable benefits. Grow with Google has been reviewed 2 times, with an average rating of 4 out of 5. 100% of reviewers would recommend Grow with Google to a friend.

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Posted by Elvis on 04/26/21 •
Section Job Hunt
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Sunday, September 20, 2020

Part-Time Jobs For Older Workers

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If you’re over 50 and looking for work, part-time jobs are a great solution. Learn about the options.

By Dan Woog
Monster contributor
May 2019

“Your company won’t always take care of you. So you’ve got to take care of yourself.” That sobering advice, from syndicated career advice columnist Jim Pawlak, is hitting home with an increasing number of men and women who were raised to believe that doing a job well translates into a lifetime of comfort but instead find that job security is rare. Unsurprisingly, jobs for older people - workers over 50 - are especially being sought out.

ACCORDING TO THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, more than 40% of adults age 55 and older are either working or looking for work as of March 2019. And a report from United Income said that 20% of adults over age 65 are either working or looking for work as of February 2019, compared with 10% in 1985.

The good news is that older workers may have fewer financial obligations than younger colleagues. With children are out of college, and homes possibly paid for, older candidates have some flexibility in the jobs to consider.

For these men and women in search of the best jobs for seniors over 60 and for workers in their 50s, part-time jobs may be an answer, although it will probably mean taking a more junior position, because, as Pawlak notes, there are no part-time positions in management.

Part-time jobs for older people are more likely to be lower-level positions in industries like retail and health care. And even for these positions, older workers must still brush up on computer skills and evaluate whether they need to expand their skill sets. But with a bit of insight and creativity, older workers can land part-time jobs that provide stimulation and challengesand pay more than minimum wage. (Have a look at all the part-time jobs available on Monster.)

Flexibility can pay off

When looking into available opportunities in your 50s, and even when researching best jobs for seniors over 60, remember that all your experience has gifted you with some valuable transferable skills. You might find you have better luck finding work outside of your industry.

Steve Reilly spent three decades in INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, but when work in that field dried up, he turned to real estate. He enrolled in the necessary courses, researched firms in his area, and sold himself as someone with both technical and organizational skills. “It’s different than getting paid for work every day,” he says. “But I love the challenge of helping people - not organizations - deal with problems.”

Michael, who asked that his last name not be used, had to dumb down his resume to get work in a Phoenix frame shop. Thirty years of hiring engineers and running MIS projects priced him out of similar work in a field flooded with younger, cheaper employees. So he turned to his earlier background as an artist, removed unrelated degrees from his resume, and landed a job.

Plenty of jobs for older people start out in a similar way and then grow over time. Michael’s hours vary, but he’s made himself valuable because he volunteers to work any shift. He’s earning less than he once did, but he’ll soon be a manager.

Dave Harrison and his wife, Marianne, were also looking for work. They weren’t laid off, but after retiring in their late 50s and moving to Florida, they wanted to work again. In their new community, they networked and asked everyone they met for advice. They applied for full-time positions. When granted interviews, they offered to work part-time to help prospective employers save money.

Eventually, Marianne got her job as an aide in an academic office that way. Dave’s job as an assistant in the office of a youth sports organization was advertised as part-time.

The key is that “we took jobs where the tasks were less than we could handle, and the pay was less than we hoped to earn,” says Dave. “We knew if we got our foot in the door, we would earn our way to more responsibility and more pay.” They set a target of one year to prove to their employers that they could do more than they were hired for and should be compensated accordingly.

They proved themselves indispensable. In less than a year, Marianne was managing logistics for a graduate MBA program while her husband became executive director of a 1,200-player program.

“No one would hire us part-time at a salary we deserved,” he says. “We had to prove our value during the first year, and swallow our pride about wages.”

Advice for older job seekers

Some of the best jobs for seniors over 60 and workers in their 50s may not be what you’re expecting right off the bat, but its important to cast a wide net and keep an open mind. Dave Harrison recommends a few strategies when seeking out jobs for older people:

· Examine all potential job opportunities, full-time and part-time.

· Consider less-than-desirable assignments.

· Go above and beyond what an employer expected.

· Give an employer enough time to appreciate your contributions before asking for more compensation.

Lastly, he stresses the importance of working in a nonbureaucratic environment. ”You want a place that is small enough so that one person’s efforts can be seen and acknowledged,” he says.

Could you use some help in the later years of your career? Join Monster for free today. As a member, you can upload up to five versions of your resume and cover letter - each tailored to the types of jobs that interest you. Recruiters search Monster every day looking to find people with the work ethic, experience, and skills for top jobs. Get found and get to work.

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Posted by Elvis on 09/20/20 •
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