Article 43

 

Dealing with Layoff

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Is There an Age Discrimination Epidemic?

image: cartoon ageism lawsuit

Is There Age Discrimination In Hiring?

By Edith S. Baker
BLS
April 2017

AGE DISCRIMINATION has long been a PART OF THE LANDSCAPE of the U.S. workplace, with countless studies examining the problem over the decades. In AGE DISCRIMINATION AND HIRING OF OLDER WORKERS (Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Economic Letter, no. 2017-06, February 27, 2017), David Neumark, Ian Burn, and Patrick Button add to the literature on the subject. Their work confirms what many studies have found: age discrimination in the workplace exists, and it is worse for older women than older men. Neumark, Burn, and Buttons research, however, stands out in that its scope is especially comprehensive, covering more than 40,000 job applicants for more than 13,000 job positions in 12 cities spread across 11 states.

The authors begin the discussion by stating this fact: the aging of the U.S. population, together with the lower labor force participation rate of older people (those 65 years and older) compared with that of their younger counterparts (ages 25 to 64 years), is inevitably leading to a sharp rise in the dependency ratio, the ratio of nonworkers to workers in the U.S. population. In other words, fewer and fewer workers will be available to support more and more nonworkers. To remedy this situation, policymakers have attempted to boost the labor supply of older workers. Policies aimed at doing that have centered around reforming the Social Security program: reducing benefits for those who retire as early as age 62 or at any time before reaching full retirement age; increasing the full-retirement age; and taxing Social Security benefits at a lower rate, for both those who continue working while receiving benefits and those who retire and receive benefits (a double-edged sword in that, at the same time that it will induce some older workers to keep working, it will encourage others to retire and receive the lower taxed benefits). But age discrimination in hiring has the potential to thwart all these reforms.

To learn how pervasive this age discrimination is, Neumark, Burn, and Button conducted a “correspondence study” - a study in which they created job applicant profiles that they sent in response to advertisements for positions. They then measured the number of callbacks each age group of otherwise identical applicants” received for a subsequent interview. Positions applied for were administrative assistant and secretary (female applicants), janitor and security guard (male applicants), and retail sales (both genders). Their results confirmed existing research findings.

First, the authors found that, across all the applications, the callback rate for interviews was uniformly lower for older applicants - a finding that they describe as “consistent with age discrimination in hiring.” With regard to specific job positions and specific genders, older (64 to 66 years) female applicants for administrative assistant jobs had a 47-percent lower callback rate than young (29 to 31 years) female applicants and older female applicants for sales jobs had a 36-percent lower callback rate than young female applicants, with the gap being statistically significant in both cases. Similarly, for male applicants for security and janitor jobs, the callback rates for older men were lower than those for young men, but the pattern was “not as consistent or pronounced” as that for the women applying for administrative assistant and sales jobs, and in some cases the gap between young and old was not statistically significant. In the one case in which a direct comparison could be made = sales positions - the 30-percent gap in the callback rates between young and older men was statistically significant, but was still smaller than the 36-percent gap in the rates for young and older women.

In sum, three findings stand out in the study reported in this article. First, the sample of more than 40,000 job applicant profiles offers statistical evidence that there is age discrimination in hiring - discrimination against both women and men. Second, older applicants - those 64 to 66 years of age - experience more age discrimination than middle-age applicants ages 49 to 51. Third, women - especially older women, but even those of middle age - experience more age discrimination in hiring than men do. Although the study did not look at why older women experience the worst degree of age discrimination, the authors suggest that it may be because appearance matters in the low-skilled administrative and sales jobs that they chose to examine and PHYSICAL APPEARANCE is evaluated more harshly for women than for men.

Download .pdf

SOURCE

---

An Epidemic of Age Discrimination

By Patricia G. Barnes
Aging Today
January 21, 2015

Many of the ills facing older Americans today began years ago, when they were victims of age discrimination in the workplace, resulting in terminations and layoffs, chronic unemployment and, ultimately, a financially impoverished early retirement.

In my book, Betrayed: The Legalization of Age Discrimination in the Workplace (2014), I argue that age discrimination is epidemic in America because the law prohibiting age discrimination, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), was weak to begin with, and has been further weakened by the U.S. Supreme Court. The lack of effective legal recourse leaves older workers vulnerable to unfounded and harmful age discrimination, a problem that was greatly exacerbated during the Great Recession.

Almost 50 years ago, Congress based the ADEA on a faulty theory that age discrimination is different from other types of discrimination and that it is, to some extent, justified by inevitable agerelated declines. Congress inserted loopholes into the ADEA and omitted major penalties found in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion and national origin.

The Court then issued rulings that make it far more difficult to win an age discrimination lawsuit. For example, in 2009, it established a higher level of proof in ADEA cases than in lawsuits alleging race or sex discrimination. The Court accords its lowest level of review to laws that discriminate on the basis of age, as opposed to race and sex.

Discrimination Increases with the Great Recession

The Great Recession only served to increase the incidence of age discrimination, causing a damaging ripple effect that led to employers seeking to cut costs to target older workers, who then became
mired in long-term unemployment. Meanwhile, older workers lost investment savings and equity in the housing foreclosure crisis. They then were unable to rebound financially because of rampant age discrimination in hiring.

ACCORDING TO RESEARCH by the National Employment Law Project (NELP), a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that conducts research on unemployment, older workers experienced the greatest percentage increase in the size of their unemployment population from 2007 to 2011; it more than doubled from 1.3 million in 2007 to 3.2 million in 2011.

Evidence of age discrimination can be seen in a 29 percent jump in age discrimination complaints filed in 2008 with the U.S. EQUAL EMPLOYMENY OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION, almost double the increase for other types of discrimination complaints. The EEOC reports there were 24,582 age discrimination complaints filed in 2008, compared to 19,103 in 2007. The EEOC received 21,296 age discrimination complaints in 2013.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Dept. of Labors Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that older workers suffer disproportionately from long-term unemployment (unemployment lasting 27 weeks or more.) NELP reports that more than half of older jobless workers were out of work for at least six months in 2011-2012. AARP’s analysis of non-seasonally adjusted BLS data from February 2014 shows that, on average, workers ages 55 and older were unemployed for 45.6 weeks, compared with 34.7 weeks for workers younger than age 55.

Why is this? Mainstream media commentators often blame jobless older workers for lacking skills, while ignoring evidence of pervasive age discrimination in hiring. Many employers (including the federal governments Pathways Recent Graduate Program) unabashedly advertise for “recent graduates” who are, overwhelmingly, younger than age 40.

So older workers suffer: jobless older workers can’t find jobs or are relegated to poorly paid part-time work. Meanwhile, a 2013 Urban Institute report found that 63 percent of long-term unemployed or underemployed workers in 2011 skipped dental visits, 56 percent put off healthcare and 40 percent did not fill medical prescriptions. Many older adults who have jobs are vulnerable to bullying or mistreatment, realizing if they quit, they face joblessness, loss of health benefits and poverty.

Early Retirement Impoverishes

The governments rosy October 2014, 4.1 percent employment rate for workers age 55 and older ignores the millions of older workers forced into poorly paid part-time or temp work and, finally, into an unwanted and ill-advised early retirement.

Between March 2008 and March 2013, about 1.4 million more Americans opted to draw on Social Security than were expected, according to Matthew Rutledge, an economist with Boston CollegeҒs Center for Retirement Research. At the height of the recession, he says as many as 53,000 extra Americans retired early each month. A 2013 survey by the Associated Press NORC Center for Public Affairs found that 33 percent of retired Americans felt they had no choice except to retire, and 54 percent of retirees younger than age 65 felt they had no choice but to retire.

Workers who retire at age 62 suffer a 25 percent cut in their monthly Social Security benefit for the rest of their lives compared to workers who retire at age 66, and a 32 percent decrease when compared to workers who retire at age 70.

Older workers who are systematically stripped of their jobs due to age discrimination CANNOT PREPARE for a financially sound retirement. Research by the Retirement Security Project shows that part-time workers lack sufficient income to contribute to 401(k) retirement plans. Many were forced to spend down whatever savings they had left after the recession. In retirement, they will be unable to cover medical expenses not covered by Medicaid, rising housing costs and other cost-of-living increases. Human toll aside, age discrimination costs society billions in lost productivity, higher medical and social welfare costs and higher Social Security premiums.

To improve the lives of American in their old age, society needs to stop the epidemic of age discrimination in the workplace. Congress should repeal the ADEA and add age as a protected class under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act so that older workers receive the same level of protection as other victims of illegal discrimination. And it must heed the warning of experts at the CENTER FOR ECONOMIC POLICY RESEARCH that cutting Social Security spells disaster for millions of older Americans who already are impoverished through no fault of their own.

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 08/29/17 •
Section Dealing with Layoff
View (0) comment(s) or add a new one
Printable viewLink to this article
Home

Friday, June 30, 2017

Can’t Find A Qualified US Worker Redux 3

image: geek

A New Kind of Tech Job Emphasizes Skills, Not a College Degree

By Steve Lohr
June 28, 2017

A FEW YEARS AGO, Sean Bridges lived with his mother, Linda, in Wiley Ford, W.Va. Their only income was her monthly Social Security disability check. He applied for work at Walmart and Burger King, but they were not hiring.

Yet while Mr. Bridges had no work history, he had certain skills. He had built and sold some stripped-down personal computers, and he had studied information technology at a community college. When Mr. Bridges heard IBM was hiring at a nearby operations center in 2013, he applied and demonstrated those skills.

Now Mr. Bridges, 25, is a computer security analyst, making $45,000 a year. In a struggling Appalachian economy, that is enough to provide him with his own apartment, a car, spending money and career ambitions.

“I got one big break,” he said. “That’s what I needed.”

Mr. Bridges represents a new but promising category in the American labor market: people working in so-called new-collar or middle-skill jobs. As the United States struggles with how to match good jobs to the two-thirds of adults who do not have a four-year college degree, his experience shows how a workers skills can be emphasized over traditional hiring filters like college degrees, work history and personal references. And elevating skills over pedigree creates new pathways to employment and tailored training and a gateway to the middle class.

This skills-based jobs approach matters at a time when there is a push to improve the circumstances of those left behind in the American economy, many of whom voted for President Trump.

“We desperately need to revive a second route to the middle class for people without four-year college degrees, as manufacturing once was,” said Robert Reich, a labor secretary in the Clinton administration who is now a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “We have to move toward a system that works.”

The skills-based concept is gaining momentum, with nonprofit organizations, schools, state governments and companies, typically in partnerships, beginning to roll out such efforts. On Wednesday, the approach received a strong corporate endorsement from Microsoft, which announced a grant of more than $25 million to help Skillful, a program to foster skills-oriented hiring, training and education. The initiative, led by the Markle Foundation, began last year in Colorado, and Microsoft’s grant will be used to expand it there and move it into other states.

“We need new approaches, or we"re going to leave more and more people behind in our economy,” said Brad Smith, president of Microsoft.

It is unclear whether a relative handful of skills-centered initiatives can train large numbers of people and alter hiring practices broadly. But the skills-based approach has already yielded some early and encouraging results in the technology industry, which may provide a model for other industries.

These jobs have taken off in tech for two main reasons. For one, computing skills tend to be well defined. Writing code, for example, is a specific task, and success or failure can be tested and measured. At the same time, the demand for tech skills is surging.

One tech project that has expanded rapidly is TechHire, which was created in 2015 and is the flagship program of Opportunity@Work, a nonprofit social enterprise. TechHire provides grants and expertise to train workers around the country and link them to jobs by nurturing local networks of job seekers, trainers and companies.

In just two years, TechHire’s network has grown to 72 communities, 237 training organizations and 1,300 employers. It has helped place more than 4,000 workers in jobs.

TechHires mission is partly to chip away at “the cultural hegemony of the bachelors degree,” said Byron Auguste, president of .

Nichole Clark of Paintsville, Ky., heard a radio ad last year for TechHire Eastern Kentucky. The program offered six months of training in software programming that included working with a company while being paid $400 a week. That was not much less than what Ms. Clark, now 24, was making as a manager at Pizza Hut.

“Without a college degree,” Ms. Clark said, her horizons seemed confined to low-wage jobs in fast-food restaurants, retail stores or doctors offices. The TechHire program, she said, could be “a doorway to a good-paying job, which is everything here.”

Ms. Clark made it through online screening tests and an interview and got into the program. TechHire’s role varies, and it often funds training grants, but in this program it solicited applicants and advised and shared best practices with Interapt, a software development and consulting company. The training stipends were paid for with a $2.7 million grant from the Appalachian Regional Commission.

After four months of taking all-day classes on the basics of writing software and two months of working in an internship alongside Interapt developers, Ms. Clark was hired by Interapt in May. As a member of the team that performs software quality assurance and testing, she is now paid more than $40,000 a year, about double what she made at Pizza Hut.

Ms. Clark is growing confident about her employment future. “There are endless roles you can play, if you have these skills,” she said.

In Colorado, Skillful is working to improve the flow of useful information among job seekers, employers, educators, governments and local training groups. The organization focuses on jobs in tech, health care and advanced manufacturing.

Ninety companies have worked with Skillfuls staff and partners to refine and clarify their descriptions of skills. That data has contributed to an online “training finder tool” - built by researchers at LinkedIn that shows salary ranges, skills required, training programs and nearby openings for different occupations. (Microsoft acquired LinkedIn, a Skillful partner, last year.)

“Were trying to use the very forces that are disrupting the economy” - technology and data to drive a labor market that helps all Americans,” said Zo Baird, chief executive of the Markle Foundation.

Ron Gallegos Jr., 31, has benefited from Skillfuls program. For years, he worked as a facilities manager overseeing cleaning crews in retail locations. Restless, he wanted to pursue a tech career.

He had a side gig fixing televisions, gadgets and PCs. But he was self-taught, had no college degree and needed training and credentials.

So in late 2015, Mr. Gallegos quit his job to study full time to gain training and certifications as a computer support technician, and later in network security.

At his local community college, Skillful representatives offered tips on job searches, ressum preparation, financial support and networking. At one event, Mr. Gallegos learned of a state grant available for a security course he wanted to take.

The programs career coaches also emphasized the so-called soft skills of speaking concisely, working cooperatively and attending industry and professional gatherings to meet people, Mr. Gallegos said.

Not content to just look for jobs, Mr. Gallegos created one for himself, setting up Mile High IT Services last fall. Now he works as a technology-support contractor for small businesses, and his one-man company is gaining traction, with his income exceeding $50,000 a year.

钓Its all pretty bright for me now,Ҕ he said.

In Rocket Center, where rocket engines were once built and some composite materials for American fighter jets are manufactured today, IBM occupies a few buildings and employs 350 people, including Mr. Bridges. They are working on cloud computing, cybersecurity, application development and help desks.

In the last two years, nearly a third of IBM’s new hires there and in a few other locations have not had four-year college degrees. IBM has jointly developed curriculums with the local community college, as well as one-year and two-year courses aligned with the company’s hiring needs.

For companies like IBM, which has 5,000 job openings in the United States, new-collar workers can help it meet its work force needs and do it inexpensively if those workers are far away from urban centers, where the cost of living and prevailing wages are higher.

“It makes sense for our business, for the job candidates and for the communities,” said Sam Ladah, IBM’s vice president for talent.

The company, which stopped disclosing its American employment in 2007 and regularly cuts jobs in declining businesses, declined to say whether it was increasing its total domestic work force.

But at the West Virginia center, IBM plans to hire up to 250 people this year, including more like Mr. Bridges.

“Now, were recruiting for skills,” Mr. Ladah said.

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 06/30/17 •
Section Dealing with Layoff
View (0) comment(s) or add a new one
Printable viewLink to this article
Home

Monday, June 19, 2017

Tell Your Story

image: no job, no house

Most of us are so far past any sort of reasonable breaking point even we can’t tell you how we continue. Press any of us about it and we’ll say “what choice do we have?”’ It’s at times like this that I start to think of the writers and artists who’ve come before me: Kurt Cobain, Ernest Hemingway, Sylvia Plath, Vincent Van Gough, Hunter S. Thompson, Spalding Gray and Richard Jeni and the question that I FIND MYSELF ASKING is, “Did they have THE RIGHT IDEA at the end of their lives?”
- Hopeless in 2017

Over 50 and Looking for a Job? We Want to Hear From You

We know American employers don’t always treat older workers fairly. We need your help figuring out what that looks like.

By Peter Gosselin
ProPublica
May 22, 2017

How do Americans live the LAST THIRD of their lives? What we hear, especially when it comes to working, is that this usually is a time of stability, increased flexibility and widening opportunity. The kinds of work that people 50 and older do are often gamely called “encores,” “re-careers” or “third acts.”

But “encore” doesn’t exactly fit my own experience. My aim at ProPublica is to find out whether it doesn’t fit others as well and to learn how people entering their later careers ARE FARING.

I was laid off at 63. It took me 15 months to find a new job. In the interim, my twins, then 18, headed for college. The money was (and still is) flying out the door.

Getting laid off may be the price of a dynamic economy. Getting stuck out wasn’t part of the deal, especially if, like me, you depend on wages to pay your daily expenses. And to add to the pot for when you no longer work.

Building that reserve isn’t getting any easier. American employers are ratcheting back on their contributions. Rules aimed at protecting retirement funds are under attack by the new administration.

I’ve already DONE STORIES on court battles over age discrimination and want to delve deeper into the issue. If you know of a COMPANY or organization that has made major cuts of older workers, I’d like to hear about it.

I want to do stories about people moving through their 50s and 60s WHO ARE HIT with demotions, layoffs or business closings. I want to find out what was behind the blows and how everyone coped. If you or someone you know has had one of these experiences, I’d like to talk.

I want to hear from people whove received a buyout or other parting package they thought would set them up for life only to discover it wasnҒt enough, and then had trouble getting new work.

In short, I want your views on these issues and others that youגd like addressed. We can build a community around what we learn together.

Do you have a story about age discrimination in the workplace? Help us with our reporting by answering some questions HERE.

Of course, Im not your person if you’re looking for help with your particular job hunt. Or what to wear after 50. But with your help I can provide a realistic report about the challenges, setbacks and victories that real people face living out the rest of their lives. Please contact me at: peter.gosselin at propublica.org, or by leaving a message at 917-512-0258.

Im also dusting off MY FACEBOOK account, where I’ll post my stories and anything useful I find along the way. So please dont be shy.

SOURCE

---

My story started in 2004.  To say I’ve changed for the better would cause the nose on my face to grow longer than Pinocchio’s

The mental health risks facing our long term unemployed

By Allison Milner
Daily Mercury
February 9, 2016

The mental health of the unemployed deteriorates the longer they are out of work and this is a barrier to securing future employment, research has found.

While different ways to reach this group are being trialled, no solution is firmly in sight.

The connection between unemployment and mental illness was most visible during the global financial crisis when Australia’s economic growth slowed and unemployment and underemployment increased.

Suicide rates among the unemployed rose 22% during the crisis compared to their rates prior to the crisis.

There is still an estimated 727,500 Australians out of work and a notable lack of interventions addressing the mental health needs of the unemployed.

There are likely several explanations for why the unemployed miss out on programs that could improve their mental health.

The first reason is that some of the main adopters of workplace mental health activities have been employers with no long-term obligation to provide help to the people they have let go.

If employers aren’t responsible for the mental health of the unemployed as they search for work, it would seem to fall into the remit of government employment services.

However, while governmental services have regular contact with job seekers and require them participate in a Job Plan in order to receive benefits, there appears to be a lack of attention to the mental health impacts of unemployment itself.

Some people who have a mental illness end up in a catch 22 scenario where difficulties in job seeking exacerbate mental health issues and this in turn might make it difficult to apply for jobs.

These difficulties include accessing transport to and from work, negative attitudes of employers and co-workers and concern about how to balance employment with treatment for ongoing health problems.

There is also a changing landscape of government requirements regarding access to financial support. For example, people with a disability may be asked to undertake an Job Capacity Assessment, which has flow-on implications for a person’s ability to access the Disability Support Pension.

A second reason for the lack of attention to the mental health of the unemployed is that they are harder to engage than those who are employed (who can be identified and contacted in a work setting).

This poses a challenge to face-to-face and group-based interventions addressing mental health.

Online interventions have been shown to be beneficial for those people suffering from mental health problems. Recognising this, the government launched an e-Mental Health Strategy in 2014.

The importance of electronic interventions has also recently been emphasised in the Australian government’s 2015 response to a review of mental health services.

Online interventions may be the most feasible option for the unemployed population, who otherwise may be difficult to reach or to engage face-to-face.

There are some current trials that aim to boost the mental health of job seekers using online approaches.

For example, a program from Incolink and Deakin University called “Contact & Connect” is providing online mental health support for the unemployed via a series of text messages sent from a website.

The program is designed to give unemployed people tools to look after their mental wellbeing.

The long-term goal of the trial is to break down stigma against help-seeking and encourage social interaction with friends and family.

While this approach shows promise because it can be delivered remotely and conveniently, it does not yet have results.

It’s also important to remember that online programs such as “Contact & Connect” are not meant to be undertaken at the exclusion of other treatments. Ideally, online intervention would operate hand-in-hand with face-to-face treatment.

At the end of the day, there maybe no one-size fits all approach to helping those who are unemployed back on the road to recovery.

Tackling this problem will be complex, and likely necessitate involvement from multiple stakeholders including affected individuals, families, employers, support services, government, and others.

Despite this, greater attention to the topic is needed given the large impact of job loss on an individual’s life, and the subsequent flow-on effects to mental health and wellbeing.

This story is part of a series on mental illness and the workplace. It was first published here at The Conversation

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 06/19/17 •
Section Dealing with Layoff • Section Dying America • Section Workplace
View (0) comment(s) or add a new one
Printable viewLink to this article
Home

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Working Wonders - Old Farts

older-workers.jpg

Older workers, stay positive in your job search!

By Marvin Walberg
Scripps Howard News Service
May 22, 2009

I know that it’s not going to go away, but the DOOM AND GLOOM stories about job loss are simply spreading MORE DOOM AND GLOOM. How about SOME ADVICE and positive news?

This morning the article started on page one. A 61-year old man with 40-years of experience lost his job.

"Where is a man MY AGE to find a job that pays more than minimum wage, even though I have more than 40 years of management experience?”, he asked in an on-line posting. “I am lost. In the morning I will awake and....have nowhere to go,” he continues. Then, the article goes to page seven. They get your attention, TOTALLY DEPRESS YOU, and then leave you with pages to turn!

On page seven, the article does make reference to a counselor who works with older job searchers, but still offers little in the way of direction or guidance. Bad news sells.

A 61-year old man, with health, energy and passion for his work, who also has over 40-years of management experience, just might be someone high on an employer’s list of “must-haves”—if he positions himself correctly and starts networking and selling.

But first he has to think outside the box. He has over 40-years of management experience that just happened to be in the foundry industry, but can be transferred to any other industry that needs people with experience in the following: Hiring, training, motivating, leading, disciplining, coaching and teaching a work ethic that comes with maturity and more than 40-years of experience.

So who will hire a 61-year old man? Any employer may who needs experience and realizes that a 61-year old man is in the prime of his working lifetime. Let’s talk positives, not negatives!

Instead of just sending out resumes and posting on Internet sites, he needs to think about his accomplishments and how to transfer his expertise to other industries. Then get out and network like crazy. Find support groups in churches or your local Chamber, tell everyone you know all about you and do some homework on the Internet. Find employers who need managers, get names and titles and start making contact and asking for interviews.

Be positive and believe in what you have accomplished and what you CAN STILL DO FOR YOUR NEXT EMPLOYER.

Sell yourself!

Marvin Walberg is a job search coach. Contact him at mwalberg(at)bellsouth.net, BLOG, or PO Box 43056, Birmingham, AL 35243.

SOURCE

---

Hiring Older Workers Is Good For The Office, Study Shows

By Ann Brenoff
Huffington Post
January 31, 2014

A study in the U.K. says that hiring older workers might actually be good for your company.

They not only serve as mentors to younger staff, but they also don’t call in sick as much when they are hungover and have a great track record for showing up for work on time. They also are just as technologically savvy as their younger counterparts, the study found.

According to a Daily Mail REPORT ON THE SURVEY, conducted by the Nationwide building society, even younger workers liked having some gray hairs around. Around 16 percent of Nationwide’s 17,000 employees are over 50, and two percent are 60 or older, said the Daily Mail. The study reported that almost half of the Nationwide workers over the age of 55 hadn’t taken a sick day in the past year, and most people in that age group “usually arrived early to work.”

And it’s clearly a good thing that their younger peers see the VALUE IN HAVING THEM AROUND because by 2019, PREDICTS the Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College, workers 55 and older will comprise 25 percent of the workforce. The Urban Institute PREDICTS workers 50 years and older will make up 35 percent of the labor force by 2019.

SOURCE

---

Employers are turning to older workers to fill job needs

By Dr. Steven Lindner
The Workplace Group
October 4, 2016

The oldest Baby Boomers reached the full retirement age of 65 years old in 2011, yet we are seeing many of the workers in this generation refusing to go into conventional retirement.

Rather, they are reinventing themselves and changing society’s view of the older worker.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Baby Boomers totaled more than 75 million people in 2015 and were supplanted as the largest age demographic by the Millennials, who now represent more than one-quarter of the nation’s population.

Baby Boomers who have retired from their long-term employers are now more likely than ever to take on other employment opportunities.

Retired from your previous employer no longer means retired from working altogether. Many retirees will take time to travel, play golf, complete the long overdue home project they have been wanting to do or some other project of theirs.

But after a short hiatus from a daily work schedule, a large number of Baby Boomers are coming back to the workforce.

At this stage of their lives, Baby Boomers are in a position to follow several different paths. With a good 10 years left of active employment, they tend to choose paths that have meaning and passion to them.

Although many continue in their life-long occupation, an equal number change course and pursue a second career.

With employers’ growing demands for workers across professional and trade occupations alike, there are big knowledge, skill and leadership gaps in the U.S. workforce.

But employers are turning to the older worker not just for their industry knowledge and skills, but to assist with filling in at positions that remain open due to lack of available job candidates.

To boost the supply of talent in the job market, smart employers are turning to older workers.

For example, THE WORKPLACE GROUP has launched recruitment strategies to attract them for everything from key leadership positions, advisory roles, IT and engineering roles, to serving as contact center agents assisting customers with orders, billing, and product and service related questions.

Older workers are also sought for seasonal hiring needs, particularly as the holiday season quickly approaches.

Whereas many companies have shied away from seasoned employees out of concerns that they won’t be able to afford them or offer them the job they once had, the truth is older workers value other aspects of work.

Many don’t want to return to their stressful full-time roles and are less interested in making the amount of money that they once did. Rather, they are far more interested in work that appeals to them and want employers who value them.

According to Laurie Pellegrino, founder and principal at Pellegrino Associates in New Providence, N.J., and who specializes in Executive Coaching and Leadership Development, older workers enjoy stimulating work environments and being part of the team.

They enjoy diversity of thought and often adjust better to changes in corporate organizations and practices than their younger colleagues.

After all, they have had a lifetime of learning how to deal with continual change. Ms. Pellegrino reminds us that older workers deeply appreciate being recognized for their help.

“A sincere thank you goes a long way,” she says.

Older workers often have greater flexibility with their schedules, as well as their finances, since most now have children living on their own, and large expenses like mortgages and college tuition generally are behind them.

Employers need to be creative in attracting the older worker. They are not necessarily looking for online job ads. Thus, recruitment strategies that reach out to workers over age 55 and invite them to consider an opportunity tend to be most successful.

Older workers who want to help recruiters and employers find them, should:

Energize their network

Track down former colleagues you enjoyed conducting business with and speak with them about what they are doing now. Utilize various social media channels such as LinkedIn to re-establish connections with past co-workers.

Keep their LinkedIn profile current

Continuously update your LinkedIn profile. If you’re not on any professional social media outlets, now is the time to take the leap. Meaningful job opportunities are more likely to come your way when your peer group knows what you have done and what you want to do next.

Utilize online job boards

Websites such as Career Builder, The Ladders, simply hired, and Monster.com have emerged as go-to sources for employers to advertise open positions and search for rsums.

Some sites such as RetiredBrains.com and Seniors4Hire.com specialize in job seekers age 50-plus. Consider uploading your r驩sum to make it easy for recruiters to find you and applying to job openings that interest you.

Stay active in their target profession

Attend professional conferences, take continuing education courses, pursue certification, or join a local business chamber.

Not only will this help you stay current and “in the know,” but it will also help you forge new relationships and potentially lead to your next fulfilling career opportunity.

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group, a leading “think-tank” provider of talent acquisition and recruitment process outsourcing services helping employers find, screen, assess and onboard best talent.

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 10/11/16 •
Section Dealing with Layoff
View (0) comment(s) or add a new one
Printable viewLink to this article
Home

Wednesday, September 07, 2016

The Ultimate Selishness Or Not?

suicide is always an option

There’s Nothing Selfish About Suicide

By Katie Hurley
Author, The Happy Kid Handbook
August 14, 2014

I am a survivor of suicide.

I don’t talk about it a lot these days, as I’ve reached the point where it feels like a lifetime ago. Healing was a long and grief-stricken process. There were times when I felt very alone in my grief and there were times when I felt lost and confused. The trouble with suicide is that no one knows what to say. No one knows how to react. So they smile and wave and attempt distraction… but they never ever say the word. The survivors, it seems, are often left to survive on their own.

I experienced endless waves of emotion in the days, weeks, months and even years following the loss of my father. The “what ifs” kept me up at night, causing me to float through each day in a state of perpetual exhaustion. What if I had answered the phone that night? Would the sound of my voice have changed his mind? Would he have done it at a later date, anyway? Survivor’s guilt, indeed.

Sometimes, I cried. Sometimes, I sat perfectly still watching the waves crash down on Main Beach, hoping for a sign of some kind that he had reached a better place. Sometimes, I silently scolded myself for not seeing the warning signs. Sometimes, I bargained with God or anyone else who might be in charge up there. Bring him back to us. Please, just bring him back. Sometimes I felt angry. Why us? Why me? Why him?

Yes, I experienced a range of emotions before making peace with the loss. But one thought that never ever (not even for one second) crossed my mind was this ill-informed opinion that suicide is selfish. Suicide is a lot of things, but selfish isn’t one of them.

SUICIDE IS A DECISION made out of DESPERATION, HOPELESSNESS, ISOLATION and LONELINESS. The black hole that is clinical depression is all-consuming. Feeling like a burden to loved ones, feeling like there is no way out, feeling trapped and feeling isolated are all common among people who suffer from depression.

People who say that suicide is selfish always reference the survivors. It’s selfish to leave children, spouses and other family members behind, so they say. They’re not thinking about the survivors, or so they would have us believe. What they don’t know is that those very loved ones are the reason many people hang on for just one more day. They do think about the survivors, probably up until the very last moment in many cases. But the soul-crushing depression that envelops them leaves them feeling like there is no alternative. Like the only way to get out is to opt out. And that is a devastating thought to endure.

Until you’ve stared down that level of depression, until you’ve lost your soul to a sea of emptiness and darkness… you don’t get to make those judgments. You might not understand it, and you are certainly entitled to your own feelings, but making those judgments and spreading that kind of negativity won’t help the next person. In fact, it will only hurt others.

As the world mourns the loss of Robin Williams, people everywhere are left feeling helpless and confused. HOW COULD someone who appeared so happy in actuality be so very depressed? The truth is that many, many people face the very same struggle each and every day. Some will commit suicide. Some will attempt. And some will hang on for dear life. Most won’t be able to ask for the help that they need to overcome their mental illness.

You can help.

Know the warning signs for suicide. 50-75% of people who attempt suicide will tell someone about their intention. Listen when people talk. Make eye contact. Convey empathy. And for the love of people everywhere, put down that ridiculous not-so-SmartPhone and be human.

Check in on friends struggling with depression. Even if they don’t answer the phone or come to the door, make an effort to let them know that you are there. Friendship isn’t about saving lost souls; friendship is about listening and being present.

Reach out to survivors of suicide. Practice using the words “suicide” and “depression” so that they roll off the tongue as easily as “unicorns” and “bubble gum.” Listen as they tell their stories. Hold their hands. Be kind with their hearts. And hug them every single time.

Encourage help. Learn about the resources in your area so that you can help friends and loved ones in need. Don’t be afraid to check in over and over again. Don’t be afraid to convey your concern. One human connection can make a big difference in the life of someone struggling with mental illness and/or survivor’s guilt.

30,000 people commit suicide in the United States each year. 750,000 people attempt suicide. It’s time to raise awareness, increase empathy and kindness, and bring those numbers down.

It’s time to talk about suicide and depression.

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 09/07/16 •
Section Dealing with Layoff • Section Personal
View (0) comment(s) or add a new one
Printable viewLink to this article
Home
Page 1 of 39 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »

Statistics

Total page hits 7565538
Page rendered in 1.9014 seconds
41 queries executed
Debug mode is off
Total Entries: 3077
Total Comments: 337
Most Recent Entry: 12/11/2017 09:40 am
Most Recent Comment on: 01/02/2016 09:13 pm
Total Logged in members: 0
Total guests: 9
Total anonymous users: 0
The most visitors ever was 114 on 10/26/2017 04:23 am


Email Us

Home

Members:
Login | Register
Resumes | Members

In memory of the layed off workers of AT&T

Today's Diversion

The evils of government are directly proportional to the tolerance of the people. - Frank Kent

Search


Advanced Search

Sections

Calendar

December 2017
S M T W T F S
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            

Must Read

Most recent entries

RSS Feeds

Today's News

External Links

Elvis Picks

BLS Pages

Favorites

All Posts

Archives

RSS


Creative Commons License


Support Bloggers' Rights