Article 43

 

Sunday, September 04, 2011

The Big Bad Boss II

The Big Bad Boss

The beatings will continue until morale improves
- LazrChet

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What is a Hostile Work Environment?

A HOSTILE WORK ENVIRONMENT is primarily a legal term used to describe a workplace SITUATION where an employee cannot reasonably PERFORM HIS WORK, due to certain behaviors by MANAGEMENT or CO-WORKERS that are deemed hostile. Hostility in this form is not only a boss being rude, yelling, or annoying. It is very specific, especially in the legal setting when one is suing an employer for either wrongful termination or for creating an environment that causes SEVERE STRESS to the employee.

There’s just a handful of ways in which you can define hostile work environment. Any act of sexual harassment on the part of bosses or co-workers can be viewed as hostile. Any act or remarks that are overtly discriminatory regarding age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or disability are also considered to create a hostile work environment.

The other way a hostile work environment may be defined is when a BOSS or manager begins to engage in a manner designed to make you quit in retaliation for your actions. Suppose you report safety violations at work, get injured at work, attempt to join a union, complain to upper level management about a problem at work, or act as a whistleblower in any respect. Then, the company’s response is to do all manner of THINGS TO MAKE YOU QUIT quit, like writing you up for work rules you didn’t break, reducing your hours, SCHEDULING YOU FOR HOURS, that are in total conflict with what you can do, or reducing your salary. The company’s reaction can be viewed as creating a hostile work environment, one that makes it impossible to work and is an attempt to MAKE YOU QUIT so that the employer does not have to pay unemployment benefits.

Lastly, overt hostility that threatens you physically are hostile work environments. If you really feel that you are at physical risk because of the behavior of another employee, specifically through violent behavior or threats of a violent nature, the employees manner is not only hostile but also potentially criminal.

When people find themselves in a hostile work environment, they may not know how to act or what to do. Actions should be determined by the degree of hostility. In the last example, if you truly feel a threat to your physical well being, it may serve you best to leave work and report the matter directly to the police. Such documentation can then serve you if you plan to sue the company or claim unemployment benefits.

In the first case, when discriminatory behavior is evidenced, or another employee acts in ways verging on sexual harassment, most experts in this field suggest that you act immediately. If someone tells a racist joke, let the person know that it’s inappropriate; if someone says anything of a sexual nature to you, ask him or her to stop. When the behavior continues, inform management, first with a documented letter, and second with a sit-down conversation.

Most companies have policies in place to deal with this type of behavior. When management fails to act appropriately, you can sue the company. Success in this type of lawsuit largely depends on not only how management failed to help but how you acted. If you respond with hostility in a hostile work environment, chances are your suit will be unsuccessful. Studies show that in court cases, your behavior is scrutinized just as carefully as managements behavior.

When an employer is trying to make you quit by creating a hostile work environment, if you can hold onto your job, do so. It’s then important to make complaints about this employer either to upper level management or to government agencies that help people with discrimination or poor treatment in the workforce. These agencies can vary from city to city and from state to state. A good place to start is the federal US Department of Labor, which can direct you to these resources within your particular area. You may also consider working with attorneys that specialize in suing companies for these issues. You should first check with free sources, since suing a company can be expensive, and should you lose, you may be responsible for lawyers fees and court costs.

SOURCE

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Workplace Bullying

Workplace Bullying Institute

BULLYING is a systematic campaign of interpersonal destruction that jeopardizes your health, your career, the job you once loved. Bullying is a non-physical, non-homicidal form of violence and, because it is violence and abusive, emotional harm frequently results. You may not be the first person to have noticed that you were bullied.

A hostile work environment is primarily a legal term used to describe a workplace situation where an employee cannot reasonably perform his work, due to certain behaviors by management or co-workers that are deemed hostile. Hostility in this form is not only a boss being rude, yelling, or annoying. It is very specific, especially in the legal setting when one is suing an employer for either wrongful termination or for creating an environment that causes severe STRESS to the employee.

There’s just a handful of ways in which you can define hostile work environment. Any act of sexual harassment on the part of bosses or co-workers can be viewed as hostile. Any act or remarks that are overtly discriminatory regarding age, race, gender, sexual orientation, or disability are also considered to create a hostile work environment.

The other way a hostile work environment may be defined is when a boss or manager begins to engage in a manner designed to make you quit in retaliation for your actions. Suppose you report safety violations at work, get injured at work, attempt to join a union, complain to upper level management about a problem at work, or act as a whistleblower in any respect. Then, the companys response is to do all manner of things to make you quit, like writing you up for work rules you didnҒt break, reducing your hours, scheduling you for hours that are in total conflict with what you can do, or reducing your salary. The companys reaction can be viewed as creating a hostile work environment, one that makes it impossible to work and is an attempt to make you quit so that the employer does not have to pay unemployment benefits.

Lastly, overt hostility that threatens you physically are hostile work environments. If you really feel that you are at physical risk because of the behavior of another employee, specifically through violent behavior or threats of a violent nature, the employee’s manner is not only hostile but also potentially criminal.

When people find themselves in a hostile work environment, they may not know how to act or what to do. Actions should be determined by the degree of hostility. In the last example, if you truly feel a threat to your physical well being, it may serve you best to leave work and report the matter directly to the police. Such documentation can then serve you if you plan to sue the company or claim unemployment benefits.

In the first case, when discriminatory behavior is evidenced, or another employee acts in ways verging on sexual harassment, most experts in this field suggest that you act immediately. If someone tells a racist joke, let the person know that its inappropriate; if someone says anything of a sexual nature to you, ask him or her to stop. When the behavior continues, inform management, first with a documented letter, and second with a sit-down conversation.

Most companies have policies in place to deal with this type of behavior. When management fails to act appropriately, you can sue the company. Success in this type of lawsuit largely depends on not only how management failed to help but how you acted. If you respond with hostility in a hostile work environment, chances are your suit will be unsuccessful. Studies show that in court cases, your behavior is scrutinized just as carefully as managementҒs behavior.

When an employer is trying to make you quit by creating a hostile work environment, if you can hold onto your job, do so. Its then important to make complaints about this employer either to upper level management or to government agencies that help people with discrimination or poor treatment in the workforce. These agencies can vary from city to city and from state to state. A good place to start is the federal US Department of Labor, which can direct you to these resources within your particular area. You may also consider working with attorneys that specialize in suing companies for these issues. You should first check with free sources, since suing a company can be expensive, and should you lose, you may be responsible for lawyer’s fees and court costs.

Remember, you did not cause bullying to happen. We’ve broken down the major reasons why bullies bully. The primary reason bullying occurs so frequently in workplaces is that bullying is NOT YET ILLEGAL. Bullying is four times more common than either sexual harassment or racial discrimination on the job.

Should you confront the bully? If you could have, you would have. Instead, use the WBI suggested 3-Step Method. Remember, put your health first. Don’t believe the lies told about you. Spend time with loved ones and friends. At times of debilitating stress like this, you must not be isolated. Isolation will only make the stress worse.

SOURCE

Experiences Outside Work

You feel like throwing up the night before the start of your work week

Your frustrated family demands that you to stop obsessing about work at home

Your doctor asks what could be causing your skyrocketing blood pressure and recent health problems, and tells you to change jobs

You feel too ashamed of being controlled by another person at work to tell your spouse or partner

All your paid time off is used for “mental health breaks” from the misery

Days off are spent exhausted and lifeless, your desire to do anything is gone

Your favorite activities and fun with family are no longer appealing or enjoyable

You begin to believe that you provoked the workplace cruelty

Experiences At Work

You attempt the obviously impossible task of doing a new job without training or time to learn new skills, but that work is never good enough for the boss

Surprise meetings are called by your boss with no results other than further humiliation

Everything your tormenter does to you is arbitrary and capricious, working a personal agenda that undermines the employer’s legitimate business interests

Others at work have been told to stop working, talking, or socializing with you

You are constantly feeling agitated and anxious, experiencing a sense of doom, waiting for bad things to happen

No matter what you do, you are never left alone to do your job without interference

People feel justified screaming or yelling at you in front of others, but you are punished if you scream back

HR tells you that your harassment isn’t illegal, that you have to “work it out between yourselves”

You finally, firmly confront your tormentor to stop the abusive conduct and you are accused of harassment

You are shocked when accused of incompetence, despite a history of objective excellence, typically by someone who cannot do your job

Everyone—co-workers, senior bosses, HR—agrees (in person and orally) that your tormentor is a jerk, but there is nothing they will do about it (and later, when you ask for their support, they deny having agreed with you)

Your request to transfer to an open position under another boss is mysteriously denied

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Another Big Bad Boss

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Bullying Update: Horrible Bosses Edition

By David R. Butcher,
ThomasNet News
Juny 20, 2011

More than a quarter of U.S. workers have experienced some form of bullying at work, perpetrated most often by their boss, recent findings show.

Following in the footsteps of Office Space, 9 to 5 and others, the newly released Horrible Bosses is Hollywoods latest humorous take on management-induced misery (and revenge). The newest in the genre offers three nightmare bosses: an overbearing psycho, a sexual predator and a corrupt business owner who plans to funnel toxic waste into an unsuspecting population, according to the movie’s website.

Such terrible managerial behavior may be hilarious on the big screen, but in real life workplace bullying severely affects employees health and employers’ bottom lines, according to the nonprofit Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI).

“Bullies wreck a terrible toll within an organization,” John Baldoni, author of Lead Your Boss and several other books on leadership, writes at the WBIs blog. “Their behavior leads to increased levels of stress among employees, higher rates of absenteeism and higher-than-normal attrition.”

Simply put, bullying is any behavior by employers or co-workers that subjects targets to repeated, abusive conduct resulting in health-harming physical and psychological effects.

Today, these toxic workers remain an all-too-common problem for millions of American professionals.

According to the WBI’s latest annual survey, released last year, 35 percent of the U.S. workforce report being bullied on the job. While the 2010 number is lower than in the 2007 report (37 percent), that is still an estimated 53.5 million American workers who experienced bullying firsthand last year. An additional 15 percent witnessed workplace bullying.

A newer study, from CareerBuilder.com, finds that 27 percent of U.S. workers have experienced some form of bullying at work.

In the job-search sites survey of more than 5,600 full-time workers nationwide, the majority of workers who have felt bullied neither confronted nor reported the perpetrator. Of those, 21 percent said it was because they feared the bullying would escalate.

Of those who have confronted the bully about his or her actions (47 percent), 43 percent said the bullying stopped, 13 percent reported the bullying became worse and 44 percent said the bullying stayed the same. Approximately 28 percent took their concerns to a higher authority and reported the bully to their HR department. While 38 percent of these workers stated that measures were taken to investigate and resolve the situation, the majority of workers (62 percent) said no action was taken.

What can companies do to prevent this kind of abuse in the workplace?

“As with any form of harassment, managements vigilance is key, with the employer close enough to day-to-day operations that such harassment is recognizable,” Monster.com says.

Yet a big part of the problem is that the manager is the bully, apparently thinking that I’m the boss is a reasonable justification for conducting him- or herself in a way that is threatening, humiliating or intimidating.

While perpetrators can be found in all ranks within organizations, including peers and even subordinates, the WBI concludes that the vast majority (72 percent) are bosses - managers, supervisors and executives.

As with the 2010 WBI findings, CareerBuilder concludes that the most common culprit is typically the boss. While 11 percent of respondents felt bullied by a co-worker, 14 percent felt bullied by their immediate supervisor and 7 percent said the bully was someone else higher up in the organization perhaps the bossגs boss?

“Avoidance of the bullying issue by senior management is a contributing factor to why bully bosses remain in their positions,” Baldoni says. “Until senior management looks more closely at the numbers behind the numbers, absenteeism, lower engagement scores and turnover - bullies will remain with us.”

SOURCE

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nothing-never.jpg

The ordinary man is passive. Within a narrow circle, home life, and perhaps the trade unions or local politics, he feels himself master of his fate. But otherwise he simply lies down and lets things happen to him.
- George Orwell - Inside the Whale, 1940

Abuse can only take place if enough people are silent about it, which is to say that those who are silent about the abuse are complicit in it. Evil can only play itself out without restraint when good people see what is happening and do nothing. Staying silent in the presence of abuse, though seemingly a passive role, is to unwittingly play an active role enabling our own victimization.
- Paul Levy - Breaking The Vow Of Silence

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Workplace Bullying On The Rise

By Ross Arrowsmith
News 4 Jax
September 1, 2011

Usually when we hear about bullying its at schools or even in cyber space, but now people are coming forward and saying they’re being bullied where they work.

It isn’t illegal to bully someone.

Being a jerk isn’t illegal in Florida, and in most parts of the country,” said Jacksonville labor attorney, VANESSA HODGERSON. Hodgerson said bullying happens more than people realize it.

“For example, (an) employer putting (an) impossible deadline on employee to comply with, and that deadline causes some type of stress,” said Hodgerson.

A law firm studying workplace bullying claims that bullying is up 70 percent in the work place. The study also states that 50 to 70 percent of the bullying comes from somebody higher up in management. Hodgerson said its not just a number to her, she said she’s experienced workplace bullying.

“As the HR manager, I had purchased a cake to celebrate birthdays that month.,” said Hodgerson. “When I came in the next morning, the sheet cake had actually been dumped upside down all over my desk. Icing, cake, everywhere!”

Hodgerson said the CEO of her company acutally dumped the cake on personnel files, important documents, and all over her keyboard. Hodgerson decided to leave her job.

Employees that feel that theyre being bullied in the workplace should contact their Human Resources representative. Experts say bullying behaivor in the work place can be illegal, if the bullying becomes habitual it can be looked at as harassment.

Since 2003, 20 states have made workplace bullying illegal. Florida is not one of them.

SOURCE

Video: FEELING BULLIED AT WORK

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The 3 Rs for Dealing with Workplace Bullying

By Danita Johnson Hughes
Endo Nurse

We’ve heard a lot recently about bullying in the classroom, but what about bullying in the boardroom? Yes, workplace bullying is a pressing problem in todays workplaces. According to the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI), 35% of the U.S. workforce report being bullied at work. That’s an estimated 53.5 million Americans being bullied right now! An additional 15% of people have witnessed workplace bullying. In all, half of all Americans have firsthand experience with workplace bullying in some way.

At first glance, its easy to brush off workplace bullying as just the way business is done. After all, haven’t we all heard such phrases as “It’s a dog eat dog world” and “Only the strong survive?” But being driven to succeed and being a bully are two completely different things.

The fact is that workplace bullying is often harmful to an organization because it impedes the organization’s growth and success. It also costs organizations dearly in terms of lost productivity, increased use of sick days, and time for managements intervention. For example, WBI estimates that between turnover and lost productivity alone, workplace bullying could cost a Fortune 500 company $24 million each year. Add another $1.4 million for litigation and settlement costs, and this is one problem no company can afford to ignore.

Since everyone has the right to work in a safe, healthy, and bully-free workplace, what can employees and leaders do to stop workplace bullying? The key is to follow the three R’s.

Recognize It

Say the word “bully” and most people envision a playground thug threatening the weakest kid around. In the workplace, bullying often looks much different. While screaming, yelling, and cursing at someone certainly constitutes bullying, other lesser-recognized forms of bullying include:

- Belittling employees

- Excluding people from meetings and other activities

- Denying employees the resources or assistance needed to get the job done

- Spreading nasty rumors about people

- Ignoring the employee

- Making dismissive remarks

- Dishing out unwarranted blame or criticism

Ultimately, anything that can be construed as an act of intimidation is really a form a bullying. And when people feel intimidated, they can’t get their job done effectively. Interestingly, both men and women bully. But the majority of bullying is same-gender harassment, which is a loophole often overlooked in anti-discrimination laws and workplace policies.

Refuse It

If you feel you’re being bullied in any way, simply refuse the attack. In other words, don’t engage the person who is bullying you. Walk away, ignore it, or don’t acknowledge the behavior. Yes, sometimes this is very difficult, especially if someone is yelling at you or pushing your buttons. But engaging with the person in the same manner he or she is attacking you will only spiral the situation out of control. Usually, not engaging the bully and showing that his or her words or actions have no effect will make the person go away.

If the bullying action includes you being ignored or ostracized, you need to take the lead and initiate a conversation with the person. State that you feel you are being ignored and why this behavior is impeding your ability to get the job done. Make sure you focus on the behavior rather than the person specifically to reduce the chances of the person becoming defensive.

Report It

If you cannot handle the bullying situation yourself, you need to talk to someone who can make a difference. Depending on the situation, this could mean talking with your boss, HR manager, or even a manager in another department. Keep going up the chain of command until you find someone who can intervene on your behalf. If no one within your organization seems willing or able to help, you may want to file a complaint against the bully with your industrys professional organization (if you have one). Fortunately, almost anything can be worked out if both parties are open to it. You simply need to find someone to act as a moderator if talking one-on-one with the bully isn’t an option.

A Bully-Free Future

With all this said, realize that a leader who is tough or demanding is not necessarily a bully. All bosses have the right and obligation to set and uphold high standards of performance, as long as they exercise fairness, respect, and objectivity in their dealings with subordinates and others. Therefore, to differentiate whether your boss is being a bully or simply being tough, check if you or your co-workers are being singled out in a negative or demeaning way. Bullying is often a personal attack; leading in a firm and focused way is not.

The only way to curb workplace bullying is to tackle the issue head on. The more awareness people have of the topic, and the more prepared they are to deal with it, the more progress companies will make to end the problem once and for all.

SOURCE

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Did you know

Responding to questions about the effect of two Supreme Court decisions on sexual harassment, the EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION (EEOC) issued a GUIDANCE to explain when an employer is liable for harassment by its supervisors. The EEOC adopted the standard set out in BURLINGTON INDUSTRIES, INC V. ELLERTH, 118 S. Ct. 2257 (1998), and FARAGHER V. CITY OF BOCA RATON, 118 S. Ct. 2275 (1998) that employers can avoid liability for supervisors who engage in hostile work environment harassment if the harassment does not result in a tangible employment action (such as termination, demotion, or transfer) that affects the harassed employee. The EEOCs Guidance does not apply exclusively to sexual harassment, which was the focus of the Supreme Court; it also addresses harassment based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, PROTECTED ACTIVITY (such as opposing discrimination or PARTICIPATING in a complaint), and DISABILITY.

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Self-Defense for Bullied Employees

Almost half of all employees have been targeted by a workplace bully. According to a March 2007 study by the Employment Law Alliance, 44% of us have been bullied by an abusive manager or supervisor.

Here are some more statistics:

81% of bullies are managers.

50% of bullies are women, and 50% are men.

84% of targets are women.

82% of targets ultimately lose their jobs.

95% of bullying is witnessed.

And the statistic that causes the most indignation? It’s estimated that only 7% of workplace bullies end up censured, transferred, or terminated.

With new and better information, however, that last statistic can change. Employees no longer have to sit back and “take it.” Employees don’t have to quit. All targets or victims of workplace bullying can become what I call “workplace warriors,” using some tried-and-true self-defense strategies designed to restore power, dignity, and options to the bullied employee.

Myths and Truths about Bullying Bosses

Before we get into self-defense strategies, let’s clear up some common misconceptions about bully bosses.

Myth: It’s a good idea to confront your bully so he or she sees that you’re not afraid.
Truth: Personal confrontations with bullies are almost never productive.

Myth: The first thing an employee should do following a bullying incident is talk to management.
Truth: Management team members interpret any confrontation an employee might have with a boss as also being a confrontation with them, and without well-documented proof of a pattern of behavior, they will likely view the employee as the problem.

Myth: You should avoid your bullying boss whenever possible.
Truth: If bullies notice you’re ducking them, they will not see this as sensible avoidance but as cowering behavior.

Myth: Don’t look a bully right in the eye. It’s provocative.
Truth: On the contrary, maintain steady eye contact. If that is too difficult, then focus between his or her eyes or on the bridge of his or her nose. One bullied employee even removed his Coke-bottle-thick glasses before a meeting so he could maintain direct eye contact with his boss without feeling intimidated.

Myth: Get personal with a bully to diffuse some of his or her anger and to show him or her your human side.
Truth: Bullies not only don’t do the personal, most don’t tolerate it in others either. Details of your personal, spiritual, or emotional life are weapons in your antagonist’s hands.

Myth: Seek help from the company’s HR department. That’s what they’re there for.
Truth: HR can be the chilliest place any employee can visit and also one of the most dangerous. HR’s allegiance is to the employerand protecting the employer from legal claims. Approach rarely, with caution, and only when fully prepared.

Myth: It’s good strategy to relate your story to as many coworkers as possible, right after an incident, if possible.
Truth: Unfortunately, your story has a negative emotional quality that can repel listeners. Allies must be identified and groomed carefully before you enlist their support. Moreover, it’s better to be circumspect about sharing your storyחwritedown detailed notes about it first. You can present it in a more organized and effective way later, when the timing is strategically advantageous.

The Seven Types of Workplace Bullies

As you’ve already learned, bully bosses are as likely to be male as female. All bullies have certain personality traits in common, however. For example, bullies are impersonalif you go away, they will use exactly the same tactics on their next victim. They communicate only indirectly through the languages of rules and hierarchy. They often display status symbols and consider targets their trophies. They issue citations rather than employing give and take. And they are not particularly interested in business solutions.

Learn what to look for in these seven types:

Subtle bullies - These bullies torment their targets with quiet but piercing techniques.

Abusive bullies - These bosses hound a target employee without mercy.

Crude bullies - These people throw their weight around loudly and physically.

Raging bullies - These people intimidate everyone in the vicinity with their out-of-control anger.

Echo bullies - Not normally abusive, these bullies mimic bullying behavior with their own subordinates.

Ghost bullies - These bullies guide, mentor, and supervise lower-level bosses in bullying techniques and tactics.

Satellite bullies - These are people of stature who undermine the target by contributing to someone else’s bullying.

10 Self-Defense Tips for Bullied Employees

If you find yourself the target of a bullying boss, there are definite dos and don’ts in terms of how you should proceed. The most time-consuming aspectand the one that’s the most difficult and involved - is documenting the patterns of abuse and building and nurturing allies and supporters. You can find helpful advice and more detailed strategy information at http://www.bullyingbosses.com.

Nevertheless, here are the basic strategies that will point you in the right direction.

Approach your bullying problem like a work project. Be methodical in how you behave, perform, document, and strategize. Take notes after an incident. Try to stay unemotional. Even though he or she is trying to make you think the opposite, it is the bully who has a serious personal and professional problem, not you.

Be a workplace warrior as you look for other work. Even as you put feelers out for other jobs, dedicate yourself wholeheartedly to vanquishing your abuser and not being a victim.

Sweat the small stuff. Documenteven the smallest incidents, which often become the most important, illustrating a pattern of bullying that might not otherwise be apparent. Teasing counts. Sarcasm counts. Ignoring or criticism counts. A very public glare or silent treatment counts.

Don’t let yourself get isolated. Every day, pick out someone you haven’t talked to for a while. Have a brief but focused, attentive conversation. Bullies work hard to alienate targets from their coworkers. Don’t let that happen to you.

Display self-esteem and broadcast positive attitude. Pay attention to how your appearancesuch as hair and clothesחis perceived by others. Have a comfy chair in your office for coworkers. Put fresh flowers on your desk. Decorate with tasteful art that will be pleasing to others. Make your personal space an oasis of calm and taste.

Try to stay in safe spots. Your abuser is less likely to attack when you are around other supervisors, known allies (particularly upright employees), and customers or other outsiders of importance to the employer. Make a list of those people and places.

During a bullying situation, excuse yourself. Don’t beat a hasty retreat, and don’t leave the building. Tell your abuser that you’re late for an appointment with HR, for example. Or casually excuse yourself to the restroom. Never enter the restroom if you are being pursued by a bully.

During an attack, try distracting your abuser. Pick up something physicalas long as it’s not a threatening itemחsuch as a critical file that needs the bully’s attention or a note with an important phone number that needs to be called. Sometimes a simple distraction is enough to get him or her to stop.

Protect your personal information. Tell bullies as little as possible about your life, family, friends, hobbies, interests, religion, and so on. Information about you gives them power.

Hold your cards close to your vest. As you’re building a case against a bully boss, the less you talk about your story to others at work, the better. Controlling what you say, when you say it, and to whom needs to be part of your overall, well-organized strategy.

Where to Go for Help

After you have documented a substantial pattern of abuse, made allies, collected witness statements from well-groomed supporters, and done everything in your power to disarm your bully (such as putting a bouquet of flowers on your desk the day after an incident to show him or her that you are feeling just fine, thank you), then it may be time to seek outside help.

There are agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the National Labor Relations Board, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, and the Department of Labor. All of these have information at their websites that might be relevant or useful.

There are unions and, of course, your HR department. There are also many aid and support groups that focus on representing a special issue or population, such as women or members of a particular minority group. Among the more notable organizations are The National Organization of Women, La Raza, NAACP, and the Asian Law Caucus.

There are also attorney groups like the National Lawyers Guild that represent multiple cases, as well as the ACLU, which specifically defends our constitutional rights, such as those associated with the First Amendment. Labor attorneys and workplace-conflict counselors are other good options.

However you choose to deal with your bully boss, be a workplace warrior, not a victim.

About the Author:

Robert Mueller, J.D., is an expert on labor-management law, a widely recognized workplace-conflicts counselor and consultant, and the author of BULLYING BOSSES

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 09/04/11 •
Section Dying America • Section Workplace
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