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Outsourcing Videos

LINK TV has some videos on OUTSOURCING:

Episode One: Flyer Beware
When a Jet Blue airliner with jammed front wheels made a dramatic landing at Los Angeles International airport in September, what the passengers and public didn’t know was that Jet Blue has outsourced its heavy maintenance to El Salvador and Canada. Flyer Beware examines the safety and security consequences of the airline industry’s increasing reliance on outsourcing airline maintenance.

We know that more than half of the 4.9 billion dollars the airlines spend on maintenance is outsourced. Contracting this work has become a common practice in recent years, as major carriers cope with bankruptcies, sharp competition and rising fuel costs.

Some carriers in the industry are contracting out more work than others. Frontier, Delta and American outsource less than the other airlines surveyed by the Inspector General of the Department of Transportation (contracting out 33 percent, 35 percent and 42 percent respectively), while America West and Alaska outsource the most in this group (72 percent and 80 percent). According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the major carriers have shed over 100,000 airline jobs in the past five years. It’s bad enough that these workers are losing their jobs, but what do these numbers really mean to the traveling public?

Episode Two: The Trouble With Outsourcing
Economists, politicians and corporate consultants keep assuring us that the current trend towards outsourcing jobs abroad is ultimately good for everyone and for the global economy. But what if you are the one who has lost your job to cheaper labor abroad? What are the real costs to you and your family and what do these costs tell us about the real trouble with outsourcing? The second episode of The Outsourcing Report: Exporting Americas Future presents some critical views on the global job shift.

Hosted by political satirist and PBS host Will Durst, The Trouble with Outsourcing tells personal stories of workers whose manufacturing and high tech jobs have been outsourced from under them and presents pointed views from leaders who urge Americans to pay attention to rapidly increasing job loss.

As the stories of Joe, the sugar plant factory worker, Teresa, a high-tech manufacturing supervisor, and Ben, a database manager, reveal, the middle class is taking the brunt of the current outsourcing epidemic. Explains New Jersey State Senator Shirley Turner, ”The blue collar jobs are gone, now theyre working on the white collar jobs, and the middle class is being squeezed right out of existence. And, when a high tech programmer loses his job in his mid-50s, will he want to retrain only to risk being outsourced again?”

In fact, current outsourcing statistics paint a vastly different picture than the rosy outlook of our politicians.

·57% of displaced workers can’t find another job that pays as much
·By the year 2015, 259,000 management positions will be moved offshore
·In 2005, more than 100,000 information and technology jobs moved offshore

Episode Three:  From Offshore To Homeshore
When New Jersey State Senator Shirley Turner discovered a state-funded food stamp call center had been offshored to India, she launched a battle to keep state jobs in the US. From Offshore to Homeshore tells the story of how Turner passed legislation to restrict the outsourcing of state jobs, and how she bought the welfare call center back to New Jersey, which inspired eight other states to do the same.

Episode Four: The Upside of Outsourcing?
Three proponents of our interconnected global markets sound off on the possibilities and pitfalls of the brave new economic world we all share.

Daniel Griswold is Director of the Center for Trade and Policy Studies at conservative think tank The Cato Institute. “Offshoring is having a profoundly positive effect on the US economy,” he says. “It raises the productivity of society overall, gives us new opportunities for production, as consumers, and raises our overall standard of living. And it also builds connections with people in other countries, kind of knitting the world together in a community of work.”

Catherine Mann, an economist at the non-partisan Institute for International Economics, is the author of a well-known study on IT offshoring. “Offshoring does not abandon US interests,” she says. “There are many benefits to the US economy, to US workers and US businesses that come from being able to fragment the production process.”

Robert Reich served as Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. He is now a Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley and has published numerous books, notably The Work Of Nations. “If you have a college degree, you are on an upward escalator,” he says. “Now it’s true, you’re not going to have much job security, and if you’re worried about job security, sorry. This is a different economy, a different world, a different technological universe. You’re going to have to change jobs and change skills and you’re going to have to maneuver and navigate in ways that may be uncomfortable.”

Episode Five:  Sweatshop Warriors
Charles Kernaghan and Barbara Briggs are working to improve conditions in the overseas garment factories where U.S. companies make our clothing.

Selina’s Story
Sewing clothing for Wal-Mart, 13-year-old Selina earned just 7 cents an hour. She is one of 1.8 million garment workers in Bangladesh, approximately 85 percent of whom are young women.

In August of 2002, Charles Kernaghan and Barbara Briggs visited a huge industrial zone in the Bagladeshi port city of Chittagong. There they met 13-year-old Selina, who worked in a factory called MNC sewing clothing for Wal-Mart. Selina described a grueling schedule of long hours and forced overtime that had become all too familiar to Kernaghan and Briggs during their investigations of garment factories around the globe.

The young worker explained that her regular work schedule was from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 or 10:00 p.m. each night--a shift of 13 to 14 hours a day. When the factory faced production deadlines, Selina said that she and the other workers were forced to work from 7:30 a.m. straight through to 3:00 a.m. the next morninga 19 hour shift. When they worked like this, Selina said the garment workers didn’t have time to go home, and slept on the factory floor for a few hours before starting the next shift at 7:30 a.m.  That summer, Selina said she had only had two days off.

“This was August, when young people across the U.S. were on vacation, at the beach or away at summer camp,” says Kernaghan. “Other young people their same age in Bangladesh were being forced to work until 9:00 p.m., or even 3:00 a.m., seven days a week.”

Selinas job was to mark the spot where the Wal-Mart labels were to be sewn. She did this with chalk, drawing an outline on the cloth. The factory gave her a production goal of marking 200 labels an hourԒor one operation every 18 seconds. When she worked until 10 p.m. she had to do 2,600 operations a day. She got paid just 1 cent for every 30 pieces she completed.

“One of the garments the MNC workers made was a fleece-like childs pullover carrying the Wal-Mart label SporTrax,” says Kernaghan. “This is an example of children making clothing for other children.”

Selina was paid just 7 cents an hour. She is one of 1.8 million garment workers in Bangladesh, approximately 85 percent of whom are young women.

Links
WEBSITES AND STORIES
US WAR ON THE MIDDLE CLASS
RISING OF THE TELECOM UNDERCLASS
HIGH-TECH MEXICAN SWEATSHOPS
BOOK - OUTSOURCING AMERICA
TECHIES JOBS GO OVERSEAS
THE VANISHING MIDDLE
THE HIDDEN COST OF OUTSOURCING
US CENSORSHIP - OUTSOURCING
WHEN OUTSOURCING TAKES YOUR JOB
BOOK - END OF THE LINE
OUTSOURCING GETS CLOSER TO HOME WITH CAFTA
FREE TRADE NOT ABOUT FREEDOM
THE STATE OF WORKING AMERICA
THE GLOBAL LABOR THREAT
CAN OUTSOURCING CREATE US JOBS

SOURCE

Credit: Eduardo Felix

Posted by Elvis on 06/04/06 •
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