Article 43

 

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Florida’s Unemployment January 2012

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FLORIDA’s UNEMPLOYMENT went down to 9.6% last month.

Not all of us are jumping with joy.

The ORLANDO SENTINEL REPORTS:

The statewide unemployment rate dipped in January to 9.6 percent, its lowest level in almost three years. But the state’s job-creation machine appeared to seize up, at least momentarily, as Florida recorded a month-over-month loss of almost 39,000 jobs.

Besides having the FIFTH LOWEST UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION BENEFITS in the country, thanks to SAFETY-NET eroding Governor Rick Scott and his ASSAULT ON THE JOBLESS, unemployment benefits are CUT EVEN MORE this year:

The bill creates a sliding scale for benefits beginning in 2012 by correlating the maximum weeks of benefits available with the rate of unemployment. The maximum amount of benefits available is 23 weeks when the unemployment rate is 10.5 percent or greater, and this scales down to 12 weeks of benefits when the unemployment rate is 5 percent or less.

Speaking of Governor Scott and his PROMISE to create jobs, POLITIFACT REPORTS:

Yes, Florida’s unemployment rate dropped to 9.6 percent in January - its lowest point since March 2009.

But the news isn’t so great for Gov. Rick Scott, who made creating 700,000 jobs in seven years his top campaign promise.

The state created 77,100 jobs from January 2011 through January 2012. The number’s even lower 54,200 jobs - if you exclude the month Scott was sworn into office. Either measure is far short of the deal Scott made with voters who elected him in 2010, when he said he would create 700,000 jobs in seven years.

The 2011 net jobs created was really 115,700, according to revised data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And in January 2012, the state lost 38,600 nonfarm jobs the largest drop in the country.

To add insult to injury - lets say you sign a waiver and release not to sue your former company to get SEVERANCE pay.

Per Florida STATUTE XXXI CHAPER 443 you DON’T COLLECT UNEMPLOYMENT:

Severance pay. The number of weeks that an individuals severance pay disqualifies the individual is equal to the amount of the severance pay divided by that individual’s average weekly wage received from the employer that paid the severance pay, rounded down to the nearest whole number, beginning with the week the individual is separated from employment.

Posted by Elvis on 03/21/12 •
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