Article 43

 

Monday, June 19, 2017

Tell Your Story

image: no job, no house

Most of us are so far past any sort of reasonable breaking point even we can’t tell you how we continue. Press any of us about it and we’ll say “what choice do we have?”’ It’s at times like this that I start to think of the writers and artists who’ve come before me: Kurt Cobain, Ernest Hemingway, Sylvia Plath, Vincent Van Gough, Hunter S. Thompson, Spalding Gray and Richard Jeni and the question that I FIND MYSELF ASKING is, “Did they have THE RIGHT IDEA at the end of their lives?”
- Hopeless in 2017

Over 50 and Looking for a Job? We Want to Hear From You

We know American employers don’t always treat older workers fairly. We need your help figuring out what that looks like.

By Peter Gosselin
ProPublica
May 22, 2017

How do Americans live the LAST THIRD of their lives? What we hear, especially when it comes to working, is that this usually is a time of stability, increased flexibility and widening opportunity. The kinds of work that people 50 and older do are often gamely called “encores,” “re-careers” or “third acts.”

But “encore” doesn’t exactly fit my own experience. My aim at ProPublica is to find out whether it doesn’t fit others as well and to learn how people entering their later careers ARE FARING.

I was laid off at 63. It took me 15 months to find a new job. In the interim, my twins, then 18, headed for college. The money was (and still is) flying out the door.

Getting laid off may be the price of a dynamic economy. Getting stuck out wasn’t part of the deal, especially if, like me, you depend on wages to pay your daily expenses. And to add to the pot for when you no longer work.

Building that reserve isn’t getting any easier. American employers are ratcheting back on their contributions. Rules aimed at protecting retirement funds are under attack by the new administration.

I’ve already DONE STORIES on court battles over age discrimination and want to delve deeper into the issue. If you know of a COMPANY or organization that has made major cuts of older workers, I’d like to hear about it.

I want to do stories about people moving through their 50s and 60s WHO ARE HIT with demotions, layoffs or business closings. I want to find out what was behind the blows and how everyone coped. If you or someone you know has had one of these experiences, I’d like to talk.

I want to hear from people whove received a buyout or other parting package they thought would set them up for life only to discover it wasnҒt enough, and then had trouble getting new work.

In short, I want your views on these issues and others that youגd like addressed. We can build a community around what we learn together.

Do you have a story about age discrimination in the workplace? Help us with our reporting by answering some questions HERE.

Of course, Im not your person if you’re looking for help with your particular job hunt. Or what to wear after 50. But with your help I can provide a realistic report about the challenges, setbacks and victories that real people face living out the rest of their lives. Please contact me at: peter.gosselin at propublica.org, or by leaving a message at 917-512-0258.

Im also dusting off MY FACEBOOK account, where I’ll post my stories and anything useful I find along the way. So please dont be shy.

SOURCE

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My story started in 2004.  To say I’ve changed for the better would cause the nose on my face to grow longer than Pinocchio’s

The mental health risks facing our long term unemployed

By Allison Milner
Daily Mercury
February 9, 2016

The mental health of the unemployed deteriorates the longer they are out of work and this is a barrier to securing future employment, research has found.

While different ways to reach this group are being trialled, no solution is firmly in sight.

The connection between unemployment and mental illness was most visible during the global financial crisis when Australia’s economic growth slowed and unemployment and underemployment increased.

Suicide rates among the unemployed rose 22% during the crisis compared to their rates prior to the crisis.

There is still an estimated 727,500 Australians out of work and a notable lack of interventions addressing the mental health needs of the unemployed.

There are likely several explanations for why the unemployed miss out on programs that could improve their mental health.

The first reason is that some of the main adopters of workplace mental health activities have been employers with no long-term obligation to provide help to the people they have let go.

If employers aren’t responsible for the mental health of the unemployed as they search for work, it would seem to fall into the remit of government employment services.

However, while governmental services have regular contact with job seekers and require them participate in a Job Plan in order to receive benefits, there appears to be a lack of attention to the mental health impacts of unemployment itself.

Some people who have a mental illness end up in a catch 22 scenario where difficulties in job seeking exacerbate mental health issues and this in turn might make it difficult to apply for jobs.

These difficulties include accessing transport to and from work, negative attitudes of employers and co-workers and concern about how to balance employment with treatment for ongoing health problems.

There is also a changing landscape of government requirements regarding access to financial support. For example, people with a disability may be asked to undertake an Job Capacity Assessment, which has flow-on implications for a person’s ability to access the Disability Support Pension.

A second reason for the lack of attention to the mental health of the unemployed is that they are harder to engage than those who are employed (who can be identified and contacted in a work setting).

This poses a challenge to face-to-face and group-based interventions addressing mental health.

Online interventions have been shown to be beneficial for those people suffering from mental health problems. Recognising this, the government launched an e-Mental Health Strategy in 2014.

The importance of electronic interventions has also recently been emphasised in the Australian government’s 2015 response to a review of mental health services.

Online interventions may be the most feasible option for the unemployed population, who otherwise may be difficult to reach or to engage face-to-face.

There are some current trials that aim to boost the mental health of job seekers using online approaches.

For example, a program from Incolink and Deakin University called “Contact & Connect” is providing online mental health support for the unemployed via a series of text messages sent from a website.

The program is designed to give unemployed people tools to look after their mental wellbeing.

The long-term goal of the trial is to break down stigma against help-seeking and encourage social interaction with friends and family.

While this approach shows promise because it can be delivered remotely and conveniently, it does not yet have results.

It’s also important to remember that online programs such as “Contact & Connect” are not meant to be undertaken at the exclusion of other treatments. Ideally, online intervention would operate hand-in-hand with face-to-face treatment.

At the end of the day, there maybe no one-size fits all approach to helping those who are unemployed back on the road to recovery.

Tackling this problem will be complex, and likely necessitate involvement from multiple stakeholders including affected individuals, families, employers, support services, government, and others.

Despite this, greater attention to the topic is needed given the large impact of job loss on an individual’s life, and the subsequent flow-on effects to mental health and wellbeing.

This story is part of a series on mental illness and the workplace. It was first published here at The Conversation

SOURCE

Posted by Elvis on 06/19/17 •
Section Dealing with Layoff • Section Dying America • Section Workplace
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